Best Wool Gloves and Mittens for Outdoor Adventures in 2021

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Wool gloves and mittens have been classic handwear for winter and cold weather protection for thousands of years. They are expected to keep the hands’ effectiveness during all kinds of activities – travel, sports, work, etc.

In this post, we reviewed the best wool gloves and mitts of 2021 together with their main features, styles and constructions, pros, cons, expected functionality, proper care and maintenance, and everything else you need to know before buying a pair of woolen gloves. We reviewed wool gloves for all budgets and highlighted our top 20 choices including the year’s best for various activities.

On our site, you can find a rich source of information about gloves including styles, layering, features, and maintenance to help you choose the right gloves for your need. Whether you’re interested in knowing more about liners or a more solid option for backpacking, we’ve got you covered. But let’s get straight to the point:

Girl wearing winter wool mittens
Thick wool mitts and gloves will keep your hands warm in winter and cold

Photo by Erik Odiin

Quick answer: BEST WOOL GLOVES & MITTENS FOR 2021

1. SmartWool Liner Gloves                                                         View on Amazon              View on Backcountry

2. Hestra Falt Guide Glove                                                          View on Amazon              View on Backcountry

3. SmartWool Ridgeway Gloves                                               View on Amazon              View on REI

4. Icebreaker Merino 200 Oasis Glove Liners                  View on Amazon              View on Backcountry

5. Minus33 Merino Wool Glove Liner                                   View on Amazon

6. Dachstein FOUR PLY Extreme Warm Mittens           View on Amazon

7. Öjbro Vantfabrik 4-layer Merino Mitts                          View on Amazon

8. RefrigiWear Insulated Wool Leather Palm Glove     View on Amazon

9. Minus33 Merino Wool Fingerless Gloves                     View on Amazon

10. Giro Knit Merino Wool Glove                                            View on Amazon              View on Backcountry

11. Sitka Gear Merino Glove                                                      View on Amazon

12. Vallerret Ipsoot Photography Glove                             View on Amazon

13. Outdoor Research Fairbanks Fingerless                    View on Amazon              View on Backcountry

14. REI Co-op Merino Wool Liner                                           View on REI

15. Icebreaker Merino 260 Tech Glove Liners                 View on Amazon              View on Backcountry

16. Fox River Double Ragg Extra-Heavyweight Mitt   View on Amazon              View on REI

17. Outdoor Research Flurry Sensor Gloves                    View on Amazon              View on REI

18. First Lite Aerowool Touch Liner Glove                        View on Amazon

19. Icewear Norwegian Wool Gloves                                    View on Amazon

20. Fox River Ragg & Leather Heavyweight Gloves     View on Amazon

 

 

Best all-around

#1 SmartWool Liner Gloves

SmartWool Liner Gloves

Touchscreen compatible: No

Weight: 43 g (1.5 oz)

Price (MSRP): $24

Face/shell fabric: Body: 45% merino wool, 45% acrylic, 9% nylon, 1% elastane; Thumb & index finger tip: 95% polyester, 4% other fiber, 1% elastane

Lining & insulation: No

Notable features:

  • Nice blend of merino wool and acrylic; lightweight knit for ease of movement
  • Knit-in touchscreen-friendly capability on thumb and index finger
  • Rib-knit cuff finishing for bulk-free fit

Pros:

  • Versatile and functional: great for a multitude of outdoor activities such as hiking, backpacking, running, bike riding, taking photographs, walking around the city, etc.
  • Lightweight and what’s more, the slim, bulk-free fit makes this glove suitable for use as a glove (in mild winter) or as a liner glove underneath a shell (in colder weather)
  • Allow for excellent manual dexterity; the screen-friendly design and the opportunity to work with touch screen devices with them on is another plus
  • Very comfy: the soft, cushy material feels great and adds an extra layer of warmth for your hands and fingers

Cons:

  • Weird sizing (specifically a bit longer fingers) makes it tough for some people to use on their phones
  • Not a very good option for windy, snowy or cold conditions except when worn underneath warmer gloves

Best for: Versatility

Women’s Version: Unisex

Find the latest price:

Amazon | REI | Backcountry

 

Best wool gloves for cold weather

#2 Hestra Falt Guide Glove

Hestra Falt Guide Gloves

Touchscreen compatible: No

Weight: 250 g (8.8 oz)

Price (MSRP): $165

Face/shell fabric: Leather (cowhide, goatskin)

Lining & insulation: Yes, 100% wool terry cloth/wool pile liner

Notable features:

  • Impregnated cowhide and goatskin shell
  • Eyelet and carabiner to keep the gloves together when not in use
  • Removable 5-finger wool liner

Pros:

  • Solid, all-around gloves for winter and cold weather (the wool liners are removable and replaceable so they can be removed in not-so-cold conditions); excellent workmanship and top quality materials, which is not a surprise for those familiar with other Hestra products
  • Warm and comfortable thanks to the thick wool liner; designed to excel in cold conditions, these winter gloves are named after Lars Fält – leading bushcraft and survival expert from Sweden who’s written 10 books on wilderness living skills (one of his best books is the super useful Out on the Land: Bushcraft Skills from the Northern Forest)
  • Tough, impregnated leather provides extra protection against rain and snow (note that these gloves are not waterproof so don’t expect them to provide complete protection in rainy climates/wet snow)
  • Functional, provide plenty of dexterity for doing basic things like working with tools, zipping and unzipping jackets and pants, fastening belts, using keys, etc.

Cons:

  • Expensive but if the price tag fits your wallet, go for it
  • Not the most appealing appearance as the Hestra Guide Glove looks more like a work glove
  • The right care is key to keeping their functionality (you’ll have to make sure they keep their water protection ability, etc.)

Best for: Cold weather pursuits

Women’s Version: Unisex

Find the latest price:

Amazon | Backcountry

 

Best wool gloves for snow sports

#3 SmartWool Ridgeway Gloves

SmartWool Ridgeway Gloves

Touchscreen compatible: No

Weight: 349 g (12.3 oz)

Price (MSRP): $90

Face/shell fabric: 100% Leather

Lining & insulation: Yes, 70% wool and 30% nylon

Notable features:

  • Terry loop knit lining (a blend of soft-brushed merino wool and durable nylon next to the skin)
  • Reinforced thumb and index finger (double layered)
  • Genuine leather exterior

Pros:

  • Great for on-snow professionals especially on warmer alpine ski or snowboarding days (you may wish to get a pair of more solid/warmer liners for colder days)
  • Nice design and attractive look; very well made gloves (high-quality leather, wool, and stitching)
  • Soft and comfortable – fit well/snugly (can be a bit tight initially); cozy in various settings
  • Versatile, allow the wearer to stay nimble with their fingers making these gloves suitable for various activities from snow shoveling to daily work to ski touring

Cons:

  • Not very warm but if looking for a warmer option, you can get the Ridgeway Mittens
  • Run small so you’ll need to get a size up

Best for: Snow sports & everyday

Women’s Version: Unisex

Find the latest price:

Amazon | REI | Backcountry

 

Best lightweight wool gloves

#4 Icebreaker Merino 200 Oasis Glove Liners

Icebreaker Merino 200 Oasis Glove Liners

Touchscreen compatible: No

Weight: 26 g (0.9 oz)

Price (MSRP): $35

Face/shell fabric: 96% Merino wool, 4% Lycra/elastane

Lining & insulation: No

Notable features:

  • A blend of lightweight merino wool and Lycra
  • Slim fit to allow extra under-glove warmth
  • Icebreaker wrap label on the right hand

Pros:

  • Excellent for layering: fit really well under most other winter gloves to add lightweight warmth without added bulk (plus they don’t get sweaty – the moisture-wicking and quick-drying properties of merino will keep your hands dry)
  • Soft and very comfortable to wear; you can do things with your fingertips thanks to the excellent dexterity
  • Lightweight and really packable, they will take up no space in your backpack
  • Provide extra protection against sun rays preventing sunburns

Cons:

  • Flimsy especially when these liners are used by themselves
  • Not the warmest gloves so we don’t recommend that you wear them solo on cold days
  • The fabric is a bit too stretchy

Best for: Cool-weather aerobic pursuits

Women’s Version: Unisex

Find the latest price:

AmazonBackcountry

 

Best budget buy wool gloves

#5 Minus33 Merino Wool Glove Liner

Minus33 Merino Wool Glove Liner

Touchscreen compatible: No

Weight: 45 g (1.6 oz)

Price (MSRP): $19

Face/shell fabric: 85% Merino wool, 10% stretch nylon, 5% elastic

Lining & insulation: No

Notable features:

  • Perfect for layering underneath shell gloves
  • Combination of merino wool and stretch nylon
  • Knit glove liner

Pros:

  • Versatile and easy to use liner gloves; work well during a range of outdoor sports and pursuits such as walking, hiking, running, fishing or work
  • Compact and comfortable fit make it easy to put them on and take them off
  • Reliable for winter – the high merino wool content and good quality construction make these gloves suitable for various conditions (but not suitable for extreme cold unless underneath other gloves/mitts)
  • Fit under other gloves or mittens easily for added warmth (excellent dexterity and sensitivity while other gloves are off)

Cons:

  • Slippery, can’t provide good grip in icy conditions
  • No touch function, which is a huge minus if you’d like to use your phone while with them
  • Too thin weave so these gloves are not among the most durable wool gloves

Best for: First layer/Pairing

Women’s Version: Unisex

Find the latest price:

Amazon

 

Best wool mittens

#6 Dachstein FOUR PLY Extreme Warm Mittens

Dachstein FOUR PLY Extreme Warm Mittens

Touchscreen compatible: No

Weight: 221 g (7.8 oz)

Price (MSRP): $67

Face/shell fabric: 100% Wool

Lining & insulation: Yes, wool

Notable features:

  • Organically made boiled wool; dense weave
  • Thick 4 ply strands wool
  • Long cuff with full wrist coverage

Pros:

  • Incredible warmth – the thick boiled wool material makes them a great option for cold environments and conditions – these mittens work great for extreme cold weather activities even for people with poor circulation in their fingers (in spite of the dense material that helps to cut the wind, note that these are NOT windproof)
  • Good quality wool mitts made from great natural material in Austria
  • Incredibly durable for wool gloves
  • Comfort and non-itch feel thanks to the high-quality wool; nice fit; there’s enough room inside to wear a pair of tight-fitting liner gloves

Cons:

  • The wool these mitts are made of works great but it isn’t as soft as merino or cashmere
  • Those used to wearing mitts will be quite surprised that there’s no inner liner for the fingers
  • Need proper care (hand wash in cold water works great as it can increase their lifetime; also make sure to avoid high heat when drying them); for more information on how to take care of wool and woolen products, see the ‘Wool care and maintenance section’ in this text

Best for: Alpine environments

Women’s Version: Unisex

Find the latest price:

Amazon

 

Best gloves for Raynaud’s syndrome

#7 Öjbro Vantfabrik 4-layer Merino Mitts

Oejbro Vantfabrik 4-layer Merino Mitts

Touchscreen compatible: No

Weight: 113 g (4 oz)

Price (MSRP): $90

Face/shell fabric: 100% Merino wool

Lining & insulation: Yes, Interlining 1: OEJBRO Soft-warm; Interlining 2: Thinsulate; Inner lining: Tricot

Notable features:

  • 4-layer mitten for extra warmth
  • Soft merino wool with fluffy insulating interior
  • Washing instructions inside the mitten

Pros:

  • Toasty warm thanks to the 4-layer construction engineered to provide the best possible warmth (suitable for temperatures well below freezing); so warm that they work perfectly even for those with the Raynaud’s Syndrome i.e. exaggerated sensitivity to cold temperatures
  • Premium quality: nice and soft merino wool and excellent craftsmanship
  • Wind-resistant because of the specific construction and the wind-repellent lining (they are NOT windproof)
  • Various designs and beautiful traditional Swedish patterns (+ each pair comes with a yellow and red caution label ‘VARNING VARMA VANTAR’ = Warning Warm Mittens)

Cons:

  • Not for use with anything like trekking/ski poles or something else that requires a grip (there’s a version with a suede palm that’s more suitable for when grip is needed)
  • Not durable, which is typical of 100% wool products (plus the lack of reinforcements over the palms usually means shorter lifespan)
  • Bulky, offer very limited dexterity so that you won’t be able to do many things with these mitts on your hands

Best for: Extreme cold

Women’s Version: Unisex

Find the latest price:

Amazon

 

Best wool work gloves

#8 RefrigiWear Insulated Wool Leather Palm Glove

RefrigiWear Insulated Wool Leather Palm Glove

Touchscreen compatible: No

Weight: 160 g (5.6 oz)

Price (MSRP): $24

Face/shell fabric: 100% Ragg wool outer shell

Lining & insulation: Yes, 80 g (2.8 oz) of Thinsulate insulation and fleece lining

Notable features:

  • Durable leather palm improves grip
  • Green ragg wool outer shell ensures natural protection against the cold
  • Extended double layer knit cuff

Pros:

  • Thick, provide great protection from the cold – they’ll keep your hands nice and warm down to -18°C or 0°F (have a nice and soft liner inside)
  • Work well for outside chores (shoveling snow, etc.) but need tougher palm for serious work
  • Fantastic gripping allows for handling tools and instruments
  • Nice gloves for the money – the gloves can be found for as little as $15 on sale

Cons:

  • Lack the durability typical of such kind of gloves, plus the stitching is a bit weaker than expected
  • Run smaller than expected, you’ll need to order a size or two up
  • Not windproof so they can’t provide the necessary protection in strong winds

Best for: Outside work in cold weather

Women’s Version: Unisex

Find the latest price:

Amazon

 

Best fingerless wool gloves

#9 Minus33 Merino Wool Fingerless Gloves

Minus33 Merino Wool Fingerless Gloves

Touchscreen compatible: Yes

Weight: 68 g (2.4 oz)

Price (MSRP): $19

Face/shell fabric: 90% Merino wool, 7% nylon, 3% elastic

Lining & insulation: No

Notable features:

  • Merino wool and stretch nylon
  • Pull-on closure
  • Half-finger

Pros:

  • Half-finger design to preserve the dexterity of the fingers; the design does not restrict movement or the use of fingers and hands
  • The high merino wool content is the reason why these gloves have the characteristics and properties typical of merino wool (90% content), namely moisture-wicking, antimicrobial, anti-odor, and fire resistance abilities
  • Work well when worn solo but can also be worn as liners under another set of gloves
  • Good stretch and good fit; comfortable for a range of activities such as working outside, operating cameras or as everyday wear

Cons:

  • Edges are easy to get snagged; unravel
  • Cannot withstand extreme wear and tear as the material is quite thin

Best for: Versatility

Women’s Version: Unisex

Find the latest price:

Amazon

 

Best wool gloves for cycling

#10 Giro Knit Merino Wool Glove

Giro Knit Merino Wool Glove

Touchscreen compatible: Yes

Weight: 50 g (1.8 oz)

Price (MSRP): $30

Face/shell fabric: 95% Merino wool, 5% spandex

Lining & insulation: No

Notable features:

  • Rubber detailing on the palm
  • Premium New Zealand merino wool
  • Touchscreen technology for use with mobile devices

Pros:

  • The rubber gripper dots all over the palm increase gripping for a secure grip
  • Suitable for high-dexterity outdoor activities: snug-fitting and increased finger dexterity for delicate precision work and enough flexibility for a full range of
    hand movement
  • The touchscreen capabilities make it easy to use a smartphone while the gloves are on
  • The high visibility fluorescent yellow-green color looks awesome

Cons:

  • Won’t keep your fingers warm in cold weather unless layered under heavier winter gloves/mitts as they are best for cool spring or autumn days as well as mild winter – the manufacturer recommends them for temperatures between 4°C and 13°C (from 40°F to 55°F)
  • Don’t offer weather resistance; especially wind-resistance is very important when walking, riding a bike or doing anything else outside in cool-to-cold weather

Best for: Cycling and high-dexterity outdoor activities in cool weather

Women’s Version: Unisex

Find the latest price:

AmazonBackcountry

 

Best wool gloves for hunting

#11 Sitka Gear Merino Glove

Sitka Gear Merino Glove

Touchscreen compatible: Yes

Weight: 68 g (2.4 oz)

Price (MSRP): $49

Face/shell fabric: Exterior: 54% Nylon; Interior: 46% 230-gram 17.5 micron merino wool

Lining & insulation: No

Notable features:

  • GORE OPTIFADE Concealment Elevated II/Subalpine/Open country camouflage pattern
  • Performance fit for minimal layering
  • Touchscreen capability allows operation of touch screen devices or GPS

Pros:

  • Works great in the field due to the GORE OPTIFADE Concealment camouflage pattern (three different patterns are available) that fools animal vision allowing the hunter to effortlessly blend into his/her surroundings
  • High tactile feel; the superb dexterity and functionality are among the main reasons why this glove can be used as a go-to glove in every situation
  • Heat-retaining liner that works well as a standalone in cool conditions; the performance fit makes it easy to layer a heavy glove on top of it in cold weather
  • Lightweight and surprisingly warm (even when damp) given how thin the Sitka Gear Merino Glove is

Cons:

  • Not the most durable glove – the merino wears really fast
  • The wool is nice and cozy but you can feel even the slightest breeze through them

Best for: Hunting in cool conditions

Women’s Version: Unisex

Find the latest price:

Amazon

 

Best wool photography gloves

#12 Vallerret Ipsoot Photography Glove

Vallerret Ipsoot Photography Gloves

Touchscreen compatible: Yes

Weight: 200 g (7.1 oz)

Price (MSRP): $110

Face/shell fabric: Genuine goats leather and 2 ply twill

Lining & insulation: Yes, 100 % Merino wool inner; Thinsulate insulation

Notable features:

  • FlipTech finger caps with magnets
  • Grippy palm print for a non-slip grip
  • Stash pocket with embedded tripod key

Pros:

  • Grippy and functional (it will take a while to get used to it); the finger dexterity and range of motion make it easy to operate a camera in different situations and to take pictures in the cold
  • Well specced glove with nice design and construction, top build quality, and good materials
  • Excellent protection against the elements (wind and cold) – great for an outdoor photography session in the mountain and cold weather
  • The stretch jersey cuff makes it easy to slip it on and off depending on the situation

Cons:

  • Fits tight, you’d probably need to get a size larger than usual
  • The labels and markings are sewn on the inside, which can cause some discomfort to those with more sensitive skin
  • A bit expensive but this glove is a winter photography glove and not an ordinary street glove

Best for: Winter photography

Women’s Version: Unisex

Find the latest price:

Amazon

 

Best of the rest

#13 Outdoor Research Fairbanks Fingerless Gloves

Outdoor Research Fairbanks Fingerless Gloves

Touchscreen compatible: Yes

Weight: 54 g (1.9 oz)

Price (MSRP): $27

Face/shell fabric: 100% Merino wool

Lining & insulation: No

Notable features:

  • Fingerless construction
  • Fully fashioned knit
  • Tapered wrist

Pros:

  • Versatile pair of fingerless gloves: can be worn alone in cool conditions or as an under glove for the colder temps
  • High-quality material, nice and long fingers
  • Super soft and very comfy to keep the hands of the wearer warm while hiking, camping, fishing, taking pictures or driving
  • Fit comfortably and allow for excellent control when used with a phone or a tablet

Cons:

  • Fragile, wear out quickly as the fine merino wool abrades easily
  • Stretch out a bit too much – the material could be woven tighter to prevent this
  • A bit slippery

Best for: All kinds of active play in the winter months

Women’s Version: Unisex

Find the latest price:

Amazon | Moosejaw | Backcountry

 

#14 REI Co-op Merino Wool Liner Gloves

REI Co-op Merino Wool Liner Gloves

Touchscreen compatible: Yes

Weight: 37 g (1.3 oz)

Price (MSRP): $27

Face/shell fabric: 50% Merino wool, 50% polyester

Lining & insulation: No

Notable features:

  • Index finger and thumb tips are touch-screen compatible
  • Leather pull tabs for easy on and off
  • Removable keeper loop to help prevent the wearer from losing them

Pros:

  • Added odor resistance and strength thanks to the nice blend material of merino wool with antibacterial properties and strong polyester
  • Lightweight, useful, and versatile liner capable of providing good insulation under big mittens
  • Maintains sufficient dexterity; allows manipulating small items
  • Minimal seams for reduced rubbing, plus the material is soft and comfortable

Cons:

  • Durability issues (seams, stitching, fabric) – this glove tends to wear out quickly especially when used as a standalone
  • Not very good with touchscreens
  • Tend to pill

Best for: Layering with windproof shells

Women’s Version: Unisex

Find the latest price:

REI

 

#15 Icebreaker Merino 260 Tech Glove Liners

Icebreaker Merino 260 Tech Glove Liners

Touchscreen compatible: Yes

Weight: 37 g (1.3 oz)

Price (MSRP): $40

Face/shell fabric: Body: 95% merino wool, 5% elastane; Thumb & index finger tip: 92% polyester, 8% elastane

Lining & insulation: No

Notable features:

  • With 95% merino wool
  • Touchscreen technology in thumb and index forefingers
  • Streamlined construction for bulk-free fit and easy layering

Pros:

  • Lightweight: though the merino wool used for these liner gloves is 260 g/m2 (or midweight), they are actually lightweight and not ‘bulky’ at all
  • Merino wool has many advantages over its alternatives used for making outdoor clothing that stays close to the body (acrylic, polyester fleece): it’s odor-resistant, hypoallergenic, regulates body temperature better, and creates/retains more warmth
  • Easy to put on an extra layer on top of these liner gloves
  • An excellent option for cold-weather layering, the Icebreaker Merino 260 Tech Glove Liners are super soft, warm (considering their weight), and comfortable

Cons:

  • Tend to fit loose because the wrist cuff finishing lacks proper closure (elastic or hook-and-loop closure); this can mess dexterity up
  • Prone to wear and tear because of the very high (95%) merino wool content
  • The touchscreen feature doesn’t work as well as the touchscreen part of other similar models

Best for: Lightweight warmth

Women’s Version: Unisex

Find the latest price:

Amazon | Backcountry

 

#16 Fox River Double Ragg Extra-Heavyweight Mitts

Fox River Double Ragg Extra Heavyweight Mitts

Touchscreen compatible: No

Weight: 454 g (16 oz)

Price (MSRP): $25

Face/shell fabric: Outer shell: 85% wool, 15% nylon; Liner: 67% acrylic, 23% wool, 10% nylon

Lining & insulation: Yes, plush terry liner

Notable features:

  • Double-thick construction
  • Soft terry liner
  • Anatomically knit

Pros:

  • Among the warmest wool mittens on the market, these mitts will keep the hands of the user toasty warm when the temperature drops into the teens; great solution for those with the Raynaud’s Syndrome
  • Provide more and better thermal insulation (even when wet) thanks to the inherent property of wool to trap still air next to the skin and to keep its great insulating properties in wet conditions
  • Designed for added comfort in winter; easy to put on and cozy to wear
  • The double-thick construction looks good and is of good quality, plus it comes at an affordable price

Cons:

  • Bulky and slow to dry
  • Run smaller than expected; slippery grip
  • It would be better if the cuff is a bit longer

Best for: Activities in below-freezing temperatures

Women’s Version: Unisex

Find the latest price:

Amazon | REI | CampSaver

 

#17 Outdoor Research Flurry Sensor Gloves

Outdoor Research Flurry Sensor Gloves

Touchscreen compatible: Yes

Weight: 78 g (2.8 oz)

Price (MSRP): $40

Face/shell fabric: Alpin-Wool Plus 2L: 43% wool, 38% polyester, 19% nylon fleece; 100% polyester backer; Touch-screen thumb and index fingertip: synthetic suede

Lining & insulation: Yes, fleece

Notable features:

  • Alpin-Wool Plus fabric with wool-nylon exterior
  • Anti-slip silicone print on palm and fingers
  • Little loops and glove clip to keep the gloves in one place when not in use

Pros:

  • Midweight gloves; not too bulky yet sufficiently warm for winter activities on sub-zero days
  • Versatile; reliable for use when the temperatures aren’t too cold; can be worn as liner gloves for those cold, cold days
  • The sensor pads can actually work with mobile phones and touch screen devices in general (using a phone keyboard is more difficult)
  • Snug fit and good grip; breathable and convenient for everyday winter wear (suitable for all activities – hiking, bike riding, camping, you name it)

Cons:

  • Not wind or waterproof so they aren’t very suitable for bad weather
  • The wool is easy to pill
  • The stitching inside can cause unwanted friction

Best for: Everyday use

Women’s Version: Available -> Amazon | REI | Backcountry

Find the latest price:

Amazon | REI | Backcountry

 

#18 First Lite Aerowool Touch Liner Glove

First Lite Aerowool Touch Liner Glove

Touchscreen compatible: Yes

Weight: 26 g (0.9 oz)

Price (MSRP): $25

Face/shell fabric: Aerowool: 65% Merino wool, 35% integrated 37.5 Technology nylon

Lining & insulation: No

Notable features:

  • Lightweight, 200 gsm Aerowool fabric
  • Touch screen sensitive thumb and index finger
  • Ergonomic pre-shaped fit

Pros:

  • Light and add no bulk to your gear
  • High-quality Aerowool material intended for ultralight base layers; work well in hot or cold weather as it manages moisture wonderfully (the active particles of the 37.5 technology capture and release moisture vapor) and dries fast
  • Work well in a large temperature spectrum varying from hot desert to cold mountain (note that these are too thin to use as anything other than glove liners)
  • Fit well; provide all-day comfort in various situations and conditions

Cons:

  • The touchscreen part isn’t very effective on some screens (note that it does work fine on some screens)
  • Little durability because of the thin wool material and the not-very-strong seams
  • Tricky sizing

Best for: Ultralighters/Lightweight pursuits

Women’s Version: Unisex

Find the latest price:

Amazon

 

#19 Icewear Norwegian Wool Gloves

Icewear Norwegian Wool Gloves

Touchscreen compatible: No

Weight: N/A

Price (MSRP): $29

Face/shell fabric: 80% Wool, 20% nylon; suede

Lining & insulation: Yes, Thinsulate

Notable features:

  • Nordic Inspired pattern
  • Grippy suede patches on the palm
  • One size fits most

Pros:

  • Warm, come with Thinsulate insulation for extra warmth; If someone knows how to make warm clothing, it’s the peoples of northern Europe (Iceland in the case of the Icewear Norwegian Wool Gloves)
  • Beautiful, come with a super cool Nordic-style pattern
  • Thick and soft wool-nylon material; the ribbed cuff makes sure these gloves fits snugly
  • Well made, the quality of construction is very good

Cons:

  • One size only
  • Do not provide a great deal of dexterity

Best for: Chilly days on and off the trail

Women’s Version: Unisex

Find the latest price:

Amazon

 

#20 Fox River Ragg & Leather Heavyweight Glove

Fox River Ragg Leather Heavyweight Gloves

Touchscreen compatible: No

Weight: 150 g (5.3 oz)

Price (MSRP): $31

Face/shell fabric: 85% Wool, 15% nylon; deer leather

Lining & insulation: Yes, Thinsulate, fleece

Notable features:

  • Premium ragg wool
  • Leather-reinforced palms and fingers
  • Anatomically knit style

Pros:

  • With 85% ragg wool for more warmth and better insulation in both dry and wet conditions
  • Solid and efficient construction: the multiple layers help keep the wind and cold out
  • Grippy, the leather-reinforced palms and fingers allow for a firm and secure grip
  • Form-fitting; anatomically knit L/R Design for left- and right-hand specific fit

Cons:

  • The deer leather palms and fingers are not as thick as we would like them to be
  • Limited dexterity: the fingers are a bit too tight making it hard to move your fingers; in addition, the gloves are quite bulky
  • The wrists are quite long

Best for: Daily winter wear

Women’s Version: Unisex

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Table 1: Best wool gloves and mitts – comparison table

PRODUCTDESCRIPTIONPROSCONS
SmartWool Liner Gloves
SmartWool Liner Gloves

#1 Best wool gloves



Weight -> 43 g (1.5 oz)
Price -> $24
Touchscreen compatible -> Yes
Lining and insulation -> No


-> Versatile and functional
-> Lightweight
-> Allow for excellent manual dexterity
-> Very comfy: soft, cushy material


-> Weird sizing
-> Won't keep your hands warm by themselves in windy, snowy or cold conditions

Hestra Falt Guide Gloves
Hestra Falt Guide Gloves

#2 Best for cold weather



Weight -> 250 g (8.8 oz)
Price -> $165
Touchscreen compatible -> No
Lining and insulation -> Yes


-> Solid, all-around gloves
-> Warm, designed to excel in cold conditions
-> Extra protection against rain and snow
-> Functional, provide plenty of dexterity


-> Hefty price tag
-> Not the most appealing appearance
-> Need proper care and maintenance

SmartWool Ridgeway Gloves
SmartWool Ridgeway Gloves

#3 Best for snow sports



Weight -> 349 g (12.3 oz)
Price -> $90
Touchscreen compatible -> No
Lining and insulation -> Yes


-> Great for on-snow professionals
-> Nice design and attractive look; very well made
-> Cozy in various settings
-> Versatile, allow the wearer to stay nimble with their fingers


-> Not very warm
-> Run small

Icebreaker Merino 200 Oasis Glove Liners
Icebreaker Merino 200 Oasis Glove Liners

#4 Best lightweight wool gloves



Weight -> 26 g (0.9 oz)
Price -> $35
Touchscreen compatible -> No
Lining and insulation -> No


-> Excellent for layering
-> Soft and super comfortable to wear
-> Lightweight, compact, easy to pack
-> Prevents sunburns


-> Flimsy construction
-> Don't add much warmth
-> The fabric is a bit too stretchy

Minus33 Merino Wool Glove Liner
Minus33 Merino Wool Gloves Liner

#5 Best budget buy wool gloves



Weight -> 45 g (1.6 oz)
Price -> $19
Touchscreen compatible -> No
Lining and insulation -> No


->Versatile and easy to use while in the outdoors
-> Compact and comfortable fit
-> Reliable for winter performance
-> Fit under other gloves or mittens easily for added warmth


-> Slippery, can't provide good grip in icy conditions
-> No touch function
-> Not not very durable

Dachstein FOUR PLY Extreme Warm Mittens
Dachstein FOUR PLY Extreme Warm Mittens

#6 Best wool mittens



Weight -> N/A
Price -> $67
Touchscreen compatible -> No
Lining and insulation -> Yes


-> Incredible warmth
-> Made from great natural material in Austria
-> Surprisingly durable for wool gloves
-> Comfort and non-itch feel


-> The wool these mitts are made of works great but it isn't as soft as merino or cashmere
-> No inner liner for the fingers
-> Need proper care

Oejbro Vantfabrik 4-layer Merino Mitts
Oejbro Vantfabrik 4-layer Merino Mitts

#7 Best gloves for Raynaud's



Weight -> 113 g (4 oz)
Price -> $90
Touchscreen compatible -> No
Lining and insulation -> Yes


-> The 4-layer construction is engineered to provide the best possible warmth
-> Premium quality
-> Wind-resistant
-> Various designs and beautiful traditional Swedish patterns


-> Not for use with anything that requires a grip
-> Not durable (no reinforcements, means shorter lifespan)
-> Bulky, very limited dexterity

RefrigiWear Insulated Wool Leather Palm Glove
RefrigiWear Insulated Wool Leather Palm Glove

#8 Best wool work gloves



Weight -> 160 g (5.6 oz)
Price -> $24
Touchscreen compatible -> No
Lining and insulation -> Yes


-> Thick, with a nice and soft liner inside
-> Work well for not very demanding outside chores
-> Fantastic gripping to handle tools and instruments
-> Affordable


-> Don't last long
-> Run smaller than expected so you'll need to order a size or two up
-> Can't provide the necessary protection in strong winds

Minus33 Merino Wool Fingerless Gloves
Minus33 Merino Wool Fingerless Gloves

#9 Best fingerless wool gloves



Weight -> 68 g (2.4 oz)
Price -> $19
Touchscreen compatible -> Yes
Lining and insulation -> No


-> Half-finger design to maintain dexterity
-> Have the characteristics and properties typical of merino wool
-> Work well as a standalone and as a liner
-> Good stretch and good fit


-> Edges are easy to get snagged
-> Can't withstand extreme wear and tear

Giro Knit Merino Wool Glove
Giro Knit Merino Wool Glove

#10 Best wool gloves for cycling


Weight -> 50 g (1.8 oz)
Price -> $30
Touchscreen compatible -> Yes
Lining and insulation -> No


-> Secure grip
-> Increased finger dexterity for delicate precision work
-> Touchscreen capabilities
-> High visibility, awesome color


-> Won't keep your fingers warm in cold weather
-> Don't offer weather resistance

Sitka Gear Merino Glove
Sitka Gear Merino Glove

#11 Best wool gloves for hunting



Weight -> 68 g (2.4 oz)
Price -> $49
Touchscreen compatible -> Yes
Lining and insulation -> No


-> Work great in the field
-> Superb dexterity and functionality
-> Heat-retaining liner with a performance fit for easy layering
-> Lightweight and surprisingly warm even when damp


-> The merino wears really fast
-> No wind-resistance - you can feel even the slightest breeze through them

Vallerret Ipsoot Photography Gloves
Vallerret Ipsoot Photography Glove

#12 Best wool photography gloves



Weight -> 200 g (7.1 oz)
Price -> $110
Touchscreen compatible -> Yes
Lining and insulation -> Yes


-> Grippy and functional
-> Nice design and construction, top build quality, and good materials
-> Great for outdoor photography session in the mountain and cold weather
-> Easy to slip it on and off


-> Fit fit, you'd probably need to get a size larger than usual
-> The labels and markings are sewn on the inside, which can cause some discomfort
-> A bit expensive

Outdoor Research Fairbanks Fingerless Gloves
Outdoor Research Fairbanks Fingerless Gloves

#13



Weight -> 54 g (1.9 oz)
Price -> $27
Touchscreen compatible -> Yes
Lining and insulation -> No


-> Versatile pair of fingerless gloves
-> High-quality material, nice and long fingers
-> Super soft and very comfy
-> Allow for excellent control when used with a phone or a tablet


-> Wear out quickly
-> Stretch out a bit too much
-> A bit slippery

REI Co-op Merino Wool Liner Gloves
REI Co-op Merino Wool Liner

#14



Weight -> 37 g (1.3 oz)
Price -> $27
Touchscreen compatible -> Yes
Lining and insulation -> No


-> A nice blend of merino wool and polyester
-> Lightweight, useful, and versatile
-> Good dexterity
-> Minimal seams for reduced rubbing


-> Tend to wear out quickly when used as standalone
-> Not very good with touchscreens
-> Tend to pill

Icebreaker Merino 260 Tech Glove Liners
Icebreaker Merino 260 Tech Glove Liners

#15



Weight -> 37 g (1.3 oz)
Price -> $40
Touchscreen compatible -> Yes
Lining and insulation -> No


-> Lightweight
-> Merino wool has many advantages over its alternatives
-> Easy to put on extra layer without adding bulk
-> An excellent option for cold-weather layering


-> Tend to fit loose and come off easily
-> Prone to durability issues
-> The touchscreen feature doesn't work that well

Fox River Double Ragg Extra Heavyweight Mitts
Fox River Double Ragg Extra-Heavyweight Mitts

#16



Weight -> 454 g (16 oz)
Price -> $25
Touchscreen compatible -> No
Lining and insulation -> Yes


-> Among the warmest wool mittens on the market
-> Provide more and better thermal insulation even when wet
-> Easy to put on and cozy to wear
-> Look good and is of good quality


-> Bulky and slow to dry
-> Run smaller than expected; slippery grip
-> It would be better if the cuff is a bit longer

Outdoor Research Flurry Sensor Gloves
Outdoor Research Flurry Sensor Gloves

#17



Weight -> 78 g (2.8 oz)
Price -> $40
Touchscreen compatible -> Yes
Lining and insulation -> Yes


-> Midweight gloves, not too bulky
-> Versatile
-> The sensor pads can actually work with mobile phones
-> Snug fit and good grip, breathable


-> Aren't very suitable for bad weather
-> The wool is easy to pill
-> The stitching inside can cause unwanted friction

First Lite Aerowool Touch Liner Gloves
First Lite Aerowool Touch Liner Glove

#18



Weight -> 26 g (0.9 oz)
Price -> $25
Touchscreen compatible -> Yes
Lining and insulation -> No


-> Light and add no bulk
-> High-quality Aerowool manages moisture
-> Work well in a large temperature spectrum
-> Provide all-day comfort


-> The touchscreen part isn't very effective on some screens
-> Little durability
-> Tricky sizing

Icewear Norwegian Wool Gloves
Icewear Norwegian Wool Gloves

#19



Weight -> N/A
Price -> $29
Touchscreen compatible -> No
Lining and insulation -> Yes


-> Come with Thinsulate lining for extra warmth
-> Super cool Nordic-style pattern
-> Thick and soft wool-nylon material
-> Well made


-> One size only
-> Do not provide a great deal of dexterity

Fox River Ragg Leather Heavyweight Gloves
Fox River Ragg & Leather Heavyweight Glove

#20



Weight -> 150 g (5.3 oz)
Price -> $31
Touchscreen compatible -> No
Lining and insulation -> Yes


-> Ragg wool for warmth and insulation
-> With multiple layers
-> Grippy, with leather-reinforced palms and fingers
-> Anatomically knit L/R Design


-> The deer leather palms and fingers are not very thick
-> Bulky, offer limited dexterity
-> The wrists are quite long

 

Wool gloves and mittens buying advice or what to consider

Materials

Wool is a natural fiber with a distinctive shape and texture – determining factors for making wool suitable for a whole range of clothing items such as gloves, headwear, base and mid-layers, sweaters, etc. The use of wool for cold weather gloves, hats, and apparel has a long history dating back to Greek and Roman times. But what’s so special about wool?

What we like about wool

  • Lightweight with a smooth surface – especially merino wool is a paragon of softness and comfort. Thus it’s a perfect material for glove liners. Note that generally, wool does not have a smooth but fuzzy surface.
  • Renewable and biodegradable – wool is among the most sustainable, planet-friendly fibers. What’s more, wool fiber can be recycled.
  • Odor-resistant and antimicrobial – the ability of wool to fight odors is what makes it a preferred fiber for high-performance apparel applications.
  • Excellent insulation – the air spaces in the wool make it an excellent insulating material – among the main reasons why wool is so popular as an insulating layer for cold-protection clothing.
  • Breathable – has the natural ability to breathe well due to the complex physical cell structure of wool.
  • Comfortable next to the skin – good at absorbing and carrying moisture along the surface, wool feels/stays comfortable even when wet.
  • Moisture management – can absorb and release humidity in such a way as to adapt to different climates and situations without affecting the comfort of the wearer.
  • Excellent flame retardancy – that’s why wool is one of the materials traditionally used for firefighters’ protective clothing.
  • Anti-static – unlike man-made fibers like polyester, nylon, and acrylic, wool is much less likely to build up a static charge.
Grey wool glove liners
Wool is classic and a perfect choice for premium glove liners suitable for all kinds of pursuits

Photo by HOerwin56

What we don’t like about wool

  • Lacks durability – 100% wool items are not very durable and can be snagged easily.
  • Can stretch/shrink out of shape easily depending on the conditions – high wet shrinkage is typical of wool, for instance.
  • Needs special care and maintenance (for more info, see the ‘Wool care and maintenance’ section below).
  • High bulk – while wool (excluding merino wool as it’s anything but bulky) is a lightweight material, it’s quite bulky reducing the dexterity offered by more solid/winter wool gloves.
  • Can be itchy – especially garments made of coarse wool. Unlike regular wool, merino wool feels soft and gentle and rarely itches.

Wool is often blended with artificial fibers like nylon and polyester to create specific product features. For example, they have some special qualities that would make a wool/polyester/nylon product stronger and more durable. Take the SmartWool Ridgeway Glove. Its liner is made of a blend of 70% wool and 30% nylon for extra durability and abrasion resistance. Keep in mind that thin and lightweight wool models with nylon and other abrasion-resistant materials won’t last for very long even if the construction is top quality. This is one of the differences between wool and non-wool glove liners.

Construction and durability

Wool is not famous for being a particularly durable or abrasion-resistant material. Actually, one of the biggest disadvantages of wool is its poor strength. This combined with the fact that wool elongates and shrinks easily make wool a perfect candidate for blending with stronger and more resilient fibers. As we mentioned above, 100% wool products won’t survive rough wear and tear for a long period of time. Poor stitching is another key factor that can seriously decrease the potential lifespan of gloves and other woolen products. Thus if you need sturdy gloves or just gloves for some serious work, look for models with reinforcements like the RefrigiWear Insulated Wool Leather Palm. The Icewear Norwegian Wool Gloves are another excellent wool/nylon option with suede reinforcement on the palm.

Wool winter mitts snowboarding
Solid wool gloves and mitts with reinforced palms are usually warm, comfortable, and durable

Photo by Karsten Winegeart

Talking about robustness, let’s see the main factors that determine the durability of wool gloves and mittens:

  • Construction – simple but well-made constructions work reasonably well for most conditions and situations. The overall quality of the construction is very important but more trivial features such as the length of the fingers can also be important. Gloves with half fingers such as the Minus33 Merino Wool Fingerless Gloves and Vallerret Ipsoot Photography Gloves are inherently flawed because of the construction itself.
  • Materials – both the quantity and quality of the materials are important. Generally, thin liner gloves weighing 30-55 g (1 oz to 2 oz) are more prone to wear and tear than 3 or 4 ply designs for extreme cold weather like the Dachstein FOUR PLY Extreme Warm Mittens.
  • Reinforcements – the presence or absence of potential reinforcements especially leather, and synthetic rubbers or natural rubbers.
  • Craftsmanship and stitching – the quality of the stitching and the workmanship are no less important than the aforementioned factors. Poor stitching can ruin even the smartest wool glove construction made with high-quality, durable materials.

Apparently, the intended uses of glove liners and heavy winter gloves/mitts are very different, hence the differences in the requirements for a pair of 28 g (1 oz) and a pair of 200 g (7 oz) wool gloves. In our post about the best glove liners, we mentioned that the Icebreaker Merino 200 Oasis Glove LinersMinus33 Merino Wool Glove Liners, and REI Co-op Merino Wool Liner Gloves are among the most unimpressive designs regarding their durability. It is primarily because of their weight and the fineness of the merino wool. The best use of such gloves is as liners. This way, the potential friction between the gloves and potentially harmful surfaces will be reduced considerably. Still, there are rare exceptions that combine low weight and an acceptable level of durability.

Weather protection and thermal insulation

Thanks to the excellent insulative abilities of wool (the wool has the ability to trap air in its structure – a very effective way of insulating), it is a preferred material for making glove liners and winter gloves. Moreover, wool and wool blends don’t lose much of their insulation properties even when having to deal with small to moderate amounts of moisture. Additionally, wool (like polyester) is a naturally water-repellent fiber and when worn next to the skin, the skin stays relatively dry even when the wool item is wet (unlike polyester).

Many designs that are well-suited for cold conditions like the Öjbro Vantfabrik 4-layer Merino Mitts, Dachstein FOUR PLY Extreme Warm Mittens, and Fox River Double Ragg Extra-Heavyweight Mitts may not work that well in wet weather but the extra layers of wool will keep the hands of the user warm for longer. Actually, the aforementioned mitt designs are an excellent option for those who have Raynaud’s phenomenon. Gloves made from the finest sheep wool (merino wool) are a great option for people who want minimum bulk and maximum protection against the elements.

Wool is not waterproof or windproof meaning that your wool gloves would need to have a protective layer or finish for extra wind and water protection. For windy, rainy or snowy conditions, you’d need a pair of wool gloves engineered to provide adequate protection. In such a case, the Hestra Falt Guide Glove is an excellent choice. Something else that we don’t like about wool is that 100% wool gloves aren’t that good at cutting the wind effectively. Keep this in mind when looking for cold weather gloves/mitts for your next adventure in the backcountry.

Wicking and drying speed

Many man-made fibers are known to have excellent wicking or moisture management properties making them an obvious choice for high-performance apparel. That’s not really true for the majority of natural fibers. Having said that, wool is probably the most effective natural fiber regarding its ability to carry moisture along the surface. But unlike synthetics, wool doesn’t feel cold and clammy when wet, which is essential for feeling your hands dry and comfortable.

Table 2: Moisture regain for popular natural and synthetic fibers

Moisture regain for different fibers

Source: High-Performance Apparel**, p.78

Drying time depends on two factors – the quantity of water absorbed and the thickness of the material. Thus you can expect that it would take less time for a pair of thin wool liner gloves (Icebreaker Merino 200 Oasis Glove Liners) to dry in comparison to thicker and heavier wool gloves and mitts (Icewear Norwegian Wool Gloves). Wool dries relatively fast compared to cotton. However, it cannot compete against synthetic materials like polyester as their moisture regain is much lower. The moisture regain of a particular material presents the absorption of a certain percentage of the dry weight of the material in moisture vapor. As may be seen from Table 2, the moisture regain for wool is between three and more than 30 times as high as the moisture regain for nylon and polyester respectively.

Weight and packability

Unlike most other lightweight fibers for activewear, wool is bulky. However, merino wool is lightweight and compact with minimum bulk. That’s why liners are often made with merino because of its low weight and packability making such gloves versatile for use in various environments and situations. Plus, lightweight liner gloves with bulk-free fit are easy to pack and store in a backpack or even inside a pocket. Thicker gloves and mittens with extra insulation can be both heavy and bulky. A good example are the Fox River Double Ragg Extra-Heavyweight Mitts – weighing approximately half a kilo (around one pound) due to the double layer of thick wool/nylon blend and a plush terry liner inside. In spite of their negatives, such gloves have their advantages. Heavyweight wool mitts and gloves are perfect for winter and extreme cold conditions and in all other situations where warmth is way more important than dexterity.

We’ve reviewed wool gloves and mitts weighing from 26 g (0.9 oz) to 454 G (16 oz) as may be seen from Graph 1 and Graph 2. The huge range of weights shows our effort to make a comprehensive list with the best wool gloves and mittens in various categories. Two models weigh less than one ounce apiece – the best lightweight design, the Icebreaker Merino 200 Oasis Liners and gloves with a sleek, low-profile design – First Lite Aerowool Touch Liner Gloves. Тhe heaviest model – Fox River Double Ragg Extra-Heavyweight Mitts weighs approximately 20 times as much as the lightest model in our review! The average weight is 128 g (4.5 oz), whereas the median weight is 68 g (2.4 oz). It’s worth noting that more than half of the wool models in our review weigh 80g (2.8 oz) or less.

All-around gloves for winter and cold weather such as the best model for snow sports – SmartWool Ridgeway Gloves (349 g or 12.3 oz) and the best gloves for cold weather – Hestra Falt Guide Gloves (250 g or 8.8 oz) are heavier but also more solid and reliable. The former rely on the nice design, attractive look, and versatility while the latter can be praised for their functionality allowing the wearer to carry out a wide range of tasks. The Icewear Norwegian Wool Gloves are another interesting option for cold weather. They come with 80 g (2.8 oz) of nice and light Thinsulate insulation with a high warmth-to-thickness ratio for extra warmth and less bulk in harsh conditions.

Graph 1: Weight comparison between wool gloves and mittens designs (in grams)

Wool gloves weight comparison grams

Graph 2: Weight comparison between wool gloves and mittens designs (in ounces) 

Wool gloves weight comparison ounces

Functionality and layering

Typically, merino wool gloves are used as liner gloves thanks to the bulk-free fit. Good models should allow for excellent fine motor skills and handling tools and other gear as well as operating electronics or fastening clothing. The downside of lightweight and thin wool gloves is the lack of adequate insulation and protection in freezing temps.

What’s important for glove liners:

  • Dexterity – liners should allow for doing a lot of things with the hands – much more than when with bulky gloves on your hands (Sitka Gear Merino Glove).
  • Use of electronics – mobile phones and other touch screen devices are an essential part of modern life (Outdoor Research Flurry Sensor Gloves).

Another widespread use of wool gloves is for winter and cold weather. Such gloves are very warm due to the solid construction of two, three, four or even more layers of wool but because of the considerable bulk, they rarely offer dexterity for fine work.

What’s important for winter gloves:

While both liner gloves and heavier winter gloves have some differences, they also have a lot in common.

What’s important for both:

Wool care and maintenance

It’s not the first time we say this but it’s really, really important to always follow the garment manufacturer’s care instructions. No doubt, this is rule number one regarding the proper care and maintenance of outdoor gear and especially textile products. Other than that, here’s what you should know about the proper maintenance and care for woolen items:

  • Woollen clothing does not need frequent washing and when done, lower washing temperatures are preferable (max 30°C or 85°F). Use shorter washing cycles and clean wool separately for machine washing to avoid cross staining of woolens and pilling.
  • Use an appropriate detergent (no fabric softeners or bleach; mild detergents usually work well).
  • Hand washing in cool water is your best option. Do not rub the woolen garment and avoid twisting or wringing.
  • Air-dry the wool garment flat to retain the size and shape.
  • To retain the shade avoid drying under direct sunlight.
  • After washing and drying woolen clothing, keep the clothing hanging and wait at least 24 hours before wearing it again. This will remove any wrinkles.
  • Store clean wool items in a dry container with mothballs avoiding direct contact with the wool as the smell can impregnate the wool.
  • Wool is naturally self-cleaning so most of the time, the substitution of brushing, airing, and spot cleaning for washing is a good option to freshen the fabric.
  • Don’t use the same woolen garment on a daily basis to help the garment retain the original shape.
  • High-quality and expensive items, as well as woolen products that are not used frequently, shouldn’t be cleaned regularly to maintain natural resiliency and increase durability.
  • Spot removal should be done immediately; wet the spot with water to prevent settling of the stain on the fabric. Try not to soak the whole garment to avoid cross staining.

For more great tips, you can check out the Care and Maintenance of Textile Products*** book.

Price

The quantity and quality of the wool content together with its fineness and other important factors determine the huge range of prices on the wool gloves market. Graph 3 below shows the price range of the best wool mittens and gloves on our list. The price tags of the wool gloves in our review vary from $19 for the most affordable designs (both models by Minus33) to $165 for the Hestra Falt Guide Gloves. Two-thirds of the wool glove models cost less than the average price, which is a bit more than $48 (very close to the price tag of the best wool gloves for hunting – Sitka Gear Merino Gloves).

Graph 3: Wool gloves and mittens price comparison (US dollars)

Wool gloves price - comparison

There are quite a few very good budget glove designs that can be bought for less than $30. We think that the Minus33 Merino Wool Glove Liner is the best budget-friendly glove because of the good combination of versatility, comfort, and compact design. Moreover, it works well under other gloves and can be easily paired with heavier gloves or mittens. The biggest cons of this wool liner are its thinness and hence moderate durability, and the lack of touch function. Another great model – the all-around winner SmartWool Liner Glove – can be found for under $30 and even under $25 as it usually comes at around $24 or less. For this amount of money, it offers lightweight insulation, unrivaled dexterity, and versatility.

If you’re looking for a pair of affordable winter-friendly gloves/mitts, we recommend checking out the Fox River Double Ragg Extra-Heavyweight Mitt as they offer lots of warmth for a fraction of the price you’d be asked to pay for a model with similar capabilities. Premium mitts such as the Öjbro Vantfabrik 4-layer Merino Mitts have some advantages over cheaper styles (the main difference is in the material and workmanship) but cost top dollar. Warm, solid, and reliable wool winter gloves such as the most expensive choice on our list – the Hestra Falt Guide Gloves have lots of useful features (removable liners with effective insulation, means to secure the gloves together when not in use, genuine leather reinforcements, etc.) and can be expected to offer a good level of protection in bad weather.

Conclusion

When temperatures drop, your hands need protection from the cold. Adequate handwear that fits well and provides comfort, functionality and enough warmth is essential for cold weather activities. In this post, we reviewed twenty of the best designs available on the market for wool gloves today. And we did our best to discuss everything that could be of use to help you choose the right pair for your needs in 2021.

Each of the woolen items reviewed here has its pros and cons. While some are lightweight and compact and allow for fine finger movement, others sacrifice dexterity for bulk and extra warmth. Remember that nothing is strictly positive or negative because more often than not, the intended purpose plays a key role in whether something is perceived as an advantage or as a disadvantage.

So, what do you prefer, wool gloves or mitts? What’s your favorite model and why? Make sure you drop us a line in the comments section below. We’d love to hear from you and as usual, all recommendations and suggestions are welcome.

 

* Icewear Norwegian Wool Gloves have 40 g (1.4 oz) of Thinsulate insulation inside but the overall weight of the gloves is N/A

** In J. McLoughlin, & T. Sabir (Eds.), High-Performance Apparel: Materials, Development, and Applications, 2018, Elsevier Ltd.

*** R. Nayak, & S. Ratnapandian, Care and Maintenance of Textile Products Including Apparel and Protective Clothing, 2018, CRC Press

 

Related Articles

Best Hiking Gloves

Best Glove Liners

Gloves and Mittens for the Cold

Warm Gloves vs Mittens

Ultimate Guide to Hiking Clothing

Properties of Cold Weather Hiking Clothing

Important Characteristics of Hiking Clothing

 

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1 thought on “Best Wool Gloves and Mittens for Outdoor Adventures in 2021”

  1. Wash winter gloves made of acrylic wool. You can hand-wash Acrylic wool with mild detergent, too. And the method is similar to washing Merino wools; as long as you do not use hot water, you are fine.To machine-wash the pair, you should put it into a cloth bag to prevent the washing cycle from sagging the glove textiles. Besides, please set the delicate and gentle cycle with a short spin. You can dry the piece with an absorbent towel, too.

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