Best Liner Gloves for Outdoor Adventures in 2021

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The main role of liner gloves is to keep your hands’ effectiveness when traveling in various climates and environments.

In this post, we reviewed the best liner gloves of 2021 together with their main features, pros, cons, technologies used, expected functionality, and everything else you need to know before buying a pair of gloves. We reviewed liners for all budgets and styles of travel and highlighted our top 21 choices including the year’s best for every activity. For convenience, a comparison table with a brief summary of all the essentials of each of the contenders on our list is available. It’s placed right after the section containing the reviews of the 21 models of liner gloves discussed here.

If curious to know more about gloves, how to layer them properly or what features are typical for gloves and mittens, we recommend you to check out our guide about the different types of gloves and mitts. You can also find an in-depth post about the best hiking gloves together with everything you need to know about how to choose the right gloves for your need. In the FAQ section, you will find an article discussing what’s different between gloves and mitts for cold weather.

Black liner gloves hood
It’s easy to do a lot of things with good liners on your hands

Quick answer: BEST LINER GLOVES FOR 2021

1. SmartWool Liner Gloves                                                         View on Amazon              View on Backcountry

2. Arc’teryx Rho Gloves                                                                View on Amazon              View on REI

3. Santic Dorin Cycling Liner Gloves                                     View on Amazon

4. Outdoor Research Waterproof Liners                           View on Amazon              View on Backcountry

5. Dakine Element Liner Gloves                                               View on Amazon

6. Minus33 Merino Wool Fingerless Gloves                     View on Amazon

7. Columbia Omni-Heat Touch Liner Gloves                     View on Amazon              View on Backcountry

8. Minus33 Merino Wool Glove Liner                                   View on Amazon

9. Outdoor Research Vigor Midweight Sensor                View on Amazon              View on Backcountry

10. Carhartt Force Heavyweight Liner Knit Glove        View on Amazon              View on Moosejaw

11. REI Co-op Merino Wool Liner                                            View on REI

12. UA Armour Liner 2.0 Gloves                                               View on Amazon              View on Backcountry

13. Dakine Storm Liner Gloves                                                  View on Amazon              View on Backcountry

14. Icebreaker Merino 260 Tech Glove Liners                 View on Amazon              View on Backcountry

15. Burton Power Stretch Glove Liner                                  View on Amazon              View on REI

16. Icebreaker Merino 200 Oasis Glove Liners               View on Amazon              View on Backcountry

17. First Lite Aerowool Touch Liner Glove                         View on Amazon

18. Mountain Hardwear Power Stretch Stimulus          View on Amazon              View on Backcountry

19. REI Co-op Polartec Power Stretch Gloves                 View on REI

20. Sitka Gear Traverse Glove                                                    View on Amazon

21. Marmot Power Stretch Connect Gloves                      View on Amazon              View on Moosejaw

 

 

Best all-around

#1 SmartWool Liner Gloves

SmartWool Liner Gloves

Touchscreen compatible: No

Weight: 43 g (1.5 oz)

Price (MSRP): $24

Face/shell fabric: Body: 45% merino wool, 45% acrylic, 9% nylon, 1% elastane; Thumb & index finger tip: 95% polyester, 4% other fiber, 1% elastane

Lining & insulation: No

Notable features:

  • Nice blend of merino wool and acrylic; lightweight knit for ease of movement
  • Knit-in touchscreen-friendly capability on thumb and index finger
  • Rib-knit cuff finishing for bulk-free fit

Pros:

  • Versatile and functional: great for a multitude of outdoor activities such as hiking, backpacking, running, bike riding, taking photographs, walking around the city, etc.
  • Lightweight and what’s more, the slim, bulk-free fit makes this glove suitable for use as a glove (in mild winter) or as a liner glove underneath a shell (in colder weather)
  • Allow for excellent manual dexterity, plus they have a screen-friendly design (work somewhat well with electronics but of course not as well as when without gloves)
  • Very comfy: the soft, cushy material feels great and adds an extra layer of warmth for your hands and fingers

Cons:

  • Weird sizing: the fingers are a little too long, which may make them tough to use on your smartphone
  • Not for use in windy, snowy or cold conditions except as liners underneath warmer gloves

Best for: Versatility

Women’s Version: Unisex

Find the latest price:

Amazon | REI | Backcountry

 

Best lightweight liners

#2 Arc’teryx Rho Gloves

Arcteryx Rho Gloves

Touchscreen compatible: Yes

Weight: 25 g (0.9 oz)

Price (MSRP): $39

Face/shell fabric: Torrent 190 (84% polyester, 16% elastane)

Lining & insulation: No

Notable features:

  • Durable, breathable, and stretchy Torrent 190 fabric
  • Sensor pads on the thumbs and fingertips allow for using touchscreen devices on the go
  • Smooth material ensures a more comfortable next-to-skin feel

Pros:

  • Lightweight and compact gloves for all your outdoor activities during milder winter or cool spring/autumn days (suitable for cold winter days when worn under a pair of winter gloves)
  • Look and feel very comfortable, have long wrists, and while they are designed to work best as liner gloves, they can be used as a glove or liner
  • Moisture-wicking and breathable fabric manages humidity very well; the fabric is fairly durable but it’s also too thin
  • Touchscreen friendly design makes them convenient to interact with touchscreen smartphones, tablets, and PCs

Cons:

  • Provide little warmth
  • Not very durable when used as gloves because the fabric is very thin
  • Not for windy weather unless used as liner glove under windproof gloves or mitts (still, the Arc’teryx Rho can be used as a standalone glove in a light breeze)

Best for: Fast and light hiking or running

Women’s Version: Unisex

Find the latest price:

Amazon | REI

 

Best budget buy liner gloves

#3 Santic Dorin Cycling Liner Gloves

Santic Dorin Cycling Liner Gloves

Touchscreen compatible: Yes

Weight: 56 g (2 oz)

Price (MSRP): $21

Face/shell fabric: 87% Polyester, 13% spandex

Lining & insulation: Yes, microfleece lining

Notable features:

  • Silicone coating all over the palm and fingers provides excellent grip in wet and dry conditions
  • Wind-stopper fabric on the back of the glove cuts the wind and reduces the amount of wind-chill, whereas the microfleece lining regulates the microclimate inside
  • Abrasion-resistant fabric between the thumb and the index finger for added wear resistance

Pros:

  • Multi-purpose gloves suitable for various sports and activities; best use is solo but can also work well as an underlayer beneath a more solid pair of gloves or mitts in cold weather
  • Grippy thanks to the silicone elements covering the palm and fingers
  • Snug fit, good stretch, easy on and off, work well when finger finesse is needed so that you can use tools, trekking poles, and zip/unzip your jacket or backpack with ease; screen-friendly for easy interaction with touchscreen devices and they also work great with PC and laptop keyboards
  • Wind-resistant thanks to the wind-stopper fabric; if staying active, they will keep you comfortable in windy weather

Cons:

  • Lightweight and not very warm especially if you have poor circulation
  • Run small plus the manufacturer offers a too-small range of size options (XL is the largest size) so basically, there are no sizes for people with larger hands
  • Inside seams can be rubbing against the fingertips

Best for: Hiking or cycling in cool weather

Women’s Version: Unisex

Find the latest price:

Amazon

 

Best waterproof liner gloves

#4 Outdoor Research Waterproof Liners

Outdoor Research Waterproof Liner Gloves

Touchscreen compatible: Yes

Weight: 78 g (2.8 oz)

Price (MSRP): $55

Face/shell fabric: Ventia insert: 95% Polyester, 5% spandex; 100% polyester tricot lining, synthetic Touchscreen suede

Lining & insulation: Yes, microfleece lining

Notable features:

  • Undercuff construction
  • Anti-slip silicone pads on palm and fingers
  • Tapered wrist and pull loops

Pros:

  • Waterproof due to the Ventia inserts that make sure that your hands stay dry in inclement weather; a bit pointless if using these solely as liner gloves
  • Thick enough and warmer than most glove liner models; with useful features to wear by themselves or layered underneath burlier gloves
  • Versatile and comfortable, these liners are suitable for all kinds of outdoor sports and activities – hiking, cross-country skiing, fishing, hunting, etc.
  • Good grip; work well when some fine motor skills are required even when they’re wet on the outside (most gloves and especially bulkier gloves will freeze stiff and become useless)

Cons:

  • One of their biggest advantages can be a huge weakness if you have sweaty hands as these liner gloves aren’t that breathable and could retain some moisture instead of transporting it to the outer layer of the gloves where it could evaporate
  • Durability issues – outside fabric, especially in the fingertips (including the touchscreen pads) tend to wear out after some moderate/heavy use
  • The fleece material pills and once soaked with water, it’s slow to dry

Best for: Lightweight weather protection for high output

Women’s Version: Unisex

Find the latest price:

Amazon | REI | Backcountry

 

Best ski & snowboard liner gloves

#5 Dakine Element Liner Gloves

Dakine Element Liner Gloves

Touchscreen compatible: Yes

Weight: 300 g (10.6 oz)

Price (MSRP): $40

Face/shell fabric: Polartec Wind Pro fleece (77% polyester, 13%, 8% elastane); silicone palm pattern

Lining & insulation: Yes, fleece

Notable features:

  • Polartec Wind Pro fleece
  • Silicone gripper palm pattern
  • Touchscreen friendly fingertips facilitate working with touchscreen devices

Pros:

  • Good as standalone gloves for spring and fall, work well underneath more substantial gloves for colder days
  • Wind-resistant thanks to the Polartec Wind Pro material engineered to reduce the amount of wind chill
  • Thin yet very warm for liner gloves; limited sweating as these are highly breathable
  • Fit snug and allow for excellent fine motor dexterity; the silicone gripper palm pattern to keep a firm grip of tools and other equipment

Cons:

  • The touchscreen feature doesn’t work very well
  • Heavier than most other models of glove liners; such a weight is more typical of winter gloves

Best for: Winter sports and pursuits

Women’s Version: Not Available

Find the latest price:

Amazon

 

Best fingerless liner gloves

#6 Minus33 Merino Wool Fingerless Gloves

Minus33 Merino Wool Fingerless Gloves

Touchscreen compatible: Yes

Weight: 68 g (2.4 oz)

Price (MSRP): $19

Waterproof technology: N/A

Face/shell fabric: 90% Merino wool, 7% nylon, 3% elastic

Lining & insulation: No

Notable features:

  • Merino wool and stretch nylon
  • Pull-on closure
  • Half-finger

Pros:

  • Half-finger design preserves the dexterity of the fingers; the gloves are easy to work with as they allow for full use of fingers and hands without restricting movement
  • The high merino wool content is the reason why these gloves have the characteristics and properties typical of merino wool (90% content), namely moisture-wicking, antimicrobial, anti-odor, and fire resistance abilities
  • Work well as a standalone but can also be worn as liner gloves under another set of gloves
  • Good stretch ensures good fit; comfortable for working outside, operating cameras, as well as everyday use

Cons:

  • Edges are easy to get snagged; unravel
  • The material is thin and this liner construction cannot withstand extreme wear and tear

Best for: Versatility

Women’s Version: Unisex

Find the latest price:

Amazon

 

Best of the rest

#7 Columbia Omni-Heat Touch Liner Gloves

Columbia Omni-Heat Touch Liner Gloves

Touchscreen compatible: Yes

Weight: 45 g (1.6 oz)

Price (MSRP): $30

Face/shell fabric: Omni-Heat Reflective Smooth Thermo Stretch Fleece: 91% Polyester, 9% elastane

Lining & insulation: Yes, fleece

Notable features:

  • With Omni-Heat thermal-reflective lining reflects body heat
  • Omni-Wick technology
  • Pull-on closure

Pros:

  • The Omni-Heat thermal-reflective lining reflects body heat and retains warmth protecting from the cold
  • The Omni-Wick technology provides excellent moisture management as it pulls moisture from the skin and spreads it into the fabric, then transports it to its surface where the moisture evaporates
  • Versatile – the Omni-Heat Touch Liner works well as a normal glove or mitten liner or as a standalone during all your winter activities
  • Very good quality and reasonable price – typical for Columbia products

Cons:

  • Work well not only as liners but also independently, however, not wind-resistant so you’d want to avoid wearing them on their own in windy conditions
  • Not very grippy
  • Run a bit larger than expected so measure your hand carefully before ordering

Best for: Warmth in cool-to-cold still weather

Women’s Version: Unisex

Find the latest price:

Amazon | Backcountry

 

#8 Minus33 Merino Wool Glove Liner

Minus33 Merino Wool Glove Liner

Touchscreen compatible: No

Weight: 45 g (1.6 oz)

Price (MSRP): $19

Face/shell fabric: 85% Merino wool, 10% stretch nylon, 5% elastic

Lining & insulation: No

Notable features:

  • Perfect for layering underneath shell gloves
  • Combination of merino wool and stretch nylon
  • Knit glove liner

Pros:

  • Versatile and easy to use while in the outdoors hiking, running, cycling, fishing, hunting or working
  • Compact and comfortable fit; easy to put on and take off
  • The 85% merino wool content and good quality construction make these gloves reliable for winter performance (still not suitable for extreme cold unless under other gloves or mitts)
  • Fit under other gloves or mittens easily for added warmth (and also dexterity and sensitivity while other gloves are off)

Cons:

  • Slippery, can’t provide good grip in icy conditions
  • No touch function (huge minus if you’d like to use your phone while with them)
  • The weave is too thin, so these are not very durable

Best for: First layer/Pairing

Women’s Version: Unisex

Find the latest price:

Amazon

 

#9 Outdoor Research Vigor Midweight Sensor Gloves

Outdoor Research Vigor Midweight Sensor Gloves

Touchscreen compatible: Yes

Weight: 51 (1.8 oz)

Price (MSRP): $30

Face/shell fabric: ActiveTemp fleece (265g): 93% polyester, 7% spandex; Thumb & Index Finger Tip: touchscreen fleece

Lining & insulation: Yes, fleece

Notable features:

  • Thermo-regulating ActiveTemp treatment
  • Anti-slip silicone pads on palm; touchscreen fleece thumb and index fingertips
  • Tapered wrist

Pros:

  • For high output activities – thanks to the Active Temp technology, they dynamically adjust your microclimate (temperature and humidity levels) in accordance with the changes in the environment to keep you comfortable in a wide range of conditions
  • Come with a set of useful features for enhanced functionality including glove clip to attach them safely to belt loops or pack, anti-slip silicone palms for non-slip gripping, and tapered wrists for a snug fit
  • Nice fit (not bulky at all and fit wonderfully inside mits) plus the breathable, moisture-wicking, and quick-drying fleece fabric works well for all kinds of use
  • Really comfortable and the touchscreen sensor tips work decently most of the time

Cons:

  • The sensor tips and the silicone elements on the palm and mid fingertip aren’t very durable
  • Works better as a liner as this glove isn’t windproof – can be used as a standalone for still cool days as well as a liner on those colder days

Best for: High output activities in cool weather

Women’s Version: Available -> Amazon | Moosejaw | Backcountry

Find the latest price:

Amazon | Moosejaw | Backcountry

 

#10 Carhartt Force Heavyweight Liner Knit Glove

Carhartt Force Heavyweight Liner Knit Glove

Touchscreen compatible: Yes

Weight: 45 g (1.6 oz)

Price (MSRP): $17

Face/shell fabric: 95% Polyester, 5% spandex

Lining & insulation: No

Notable features:

  • Built with Force technology to wick sweat and dry fast
  • Silicone palm and fingers provide excellent grip in wet and dry conditions
  • Knit cuff

Pros:

  • Warm, these liner gloves are thicker than some other models yet they’re lightweight; the knit liner is excellent for cold weather; can be worn alone in mild temperatures or as a liner in combination with the Carhartt Safety Cuff A518 Glove or other winter gloves
  • Moisture-wicking and quick-drying properties; breathable fabric
  • Great fit and surprisingly high dexterity for such gloves – it’s easy to use tools, phones, etc. while wearing the Carhartt Force Heavyweight Liners
  • Decent quality and work reasonably well with touchscreens, in general

Cons:

  • Not among the most durable liners; as about potential weak points – the seams look like the main suspect
  • The touchscreen sensitive pads work with most but not all smartphones
  • Don’t get fooled by the name of the model – these gloves are far from being heavyweight – they’re actually lightweight and thin

Best for: Using tools/fine movements in cold weather

Women’s Version: Unisex

Find the latest price:

Amazon | Moosejaw

 

#11 REI Co-op Merino Wool Liner Gloves

REI Co-op Merino Wool Liner Gloves

Touchscreen compatible: Yes

Weight: 37 g (1.3 oz)

Price (MSRP): $27

Face/shell fabric: 50% Merino wool, 50% polyester

Lining & insulation: No

Notable features:

  • Index finger and thumb tips are touch-screen compatible
  • Leather pull tabs for easy on and off
  • Removable keeper loop to help prevent the wearer from losing them

Pros:

  • A nice blend of merino wool and polyester for added odor-resistance and strength respectively
  • Lightweight, useful, and versatile liner capable of providing good insulation under big mittens
  • Maintains sufficient dexterity as it allows to manipulate small items
  • Soft and comfortable material and minimal seams for reduced rubbing

Cons:

  • Tend to wear out quickly when used as standalone (seams, fabric)
  • Not very good with touchscreens
  • Tend to pill

Best for: Layering with windproof shells

Women’s Version: Unisex

Find the latest price:

REI

 

#12 UA Armour Liner 2.0 Gloves

Under Armour Liner 2.0 Gloves

Touchscreen compatible: Yes

Weight: 91 g (3.2 oz)

Price (MSRP): $25

Face/shell fabric: 87% Polyester, 13% elastane

Lining & insulation: No

Notable features:

  • UA (Under Armour) Storm finish repels rain & snow without sacrificing breathability
  • Ultra-soft knit fabric with a smooth exterior & a plush interior
  • Ribbed wrist cuffs for a snug, comfortable fit

Pros:

  • Flexible and versatile: do a good job of keeping your hands sufficiently warm; also work well inside a pair of snow gloves for artic sub-zero conditions
  • Excellent grip perfect for handling trekking poles, ice tools or driving
  • The touch response is good – the material works great with most touchscreen devices and phones
  • Nice and comfortable fit: form to your hand so that you can do various things while they’re on without your fingers feeling restricted

Cons:

  • Not meant for heavy work: the fabric tears easy, the stitching tends to become separated, and the rubber grip comes off quickly as a result of some but not necessarily very heavy use
  • Not overly warm so that you can’t expect them to keep your hands really warm for long/in freezing temps
  • Run small so check carefully the sizing before purchasing these gloves

Best for: Mild winter days

Women’s Version: Not Available

Find the latest price:

Amazon

 

#13 Dakine Storm Liner Gloves

Dakine Storm Liner Gloves

Touchscreen compatible: Yes

Weight: 280 g (9.9 oz)

Price (MSRP): $22

Face/shell fabric: 94% Polyester, 6% elastane

Lining & insulation: Yes, fleece

Notable features:

  • 4-way stretch fleece fabric
  • Silicone gripper palm pattern for a gripping performance
  • Lace-up closure

Pros:

  • Provide decent protection from the elements when staying at least lightly active
  • Stylish look, good fit, and the touch finger pads work great (the touch screen function is really responsive)
  • Good for use with or without outer gloves; compatible with other gloves and mitts when conditions require; add another layer of warmth when combined with heavy mittens or gloves
  • Can be machine washed without shrinking (we recommend that you avoid heaters and dryers – allow them to dry at room temperature instead)

Cons:

  • A little thick for liners
  • For non-windy cold days unless paired with other gloves/mitts

Best for: Everyday use

Women’s Version: Available -> Amazon | Backcountry

Find the latest price:

AmazonBackcountry

 

#14 Icebreaker Merino 260 Tech Glove Liners

Icebreaker Merino 260 Tech Glove Liners

Touchscreen compatible: Yes

Weight: 37 g (1.3 oz)

Price (MSRP): $40

Face/shell fabric: Body: 95% merino wool, 5% elastane; Thumb & Index Finger Tip: 92% polyester, 8% elastane

Lining & insulation: No

Notable features:

  • With 95% merino wool
  • Touchscreen technology in thumb and index forefingers
  • Streamlined construction for bulk-free fit and easy layering

Pros:

  • Lightweight: though the merino wool used for these liner gloves is 260 g/m2 (or midweight), they are actually lightweight and not ‘bulky’ at all
  • Merino wool has many advantages over its alternatives used for making outdoor clothing that stays close to the body (acrylic, polyester fleece): it’s odor-resistant, hypoallergenic, regulates body temperature better, and creates/retains more warmth
  • Easy to put on extra layer without adding bulk
  • An excellent option for cold-weather layering, the Icebreaker Merino 260 Tech Glove Liners are super soft, warm (considering their weight), and comfortable

Cons:

  • Tend to fit loose and come off easily as the wrist cuff finishing lacks elastic or hook-and-loop closure; this can mess dexterity up
  • Too much merino wool content makes the glove construction more prone to wear and tear
  • The touchscreen feature doesn’t work as well as the touchscreen part of other similar models

Best for: Lightweight warmth

Women’s Version: Unisex

Find the latest price:

Amazon | Backcountry

 

#15 Burton Power Stretch Glove Liner

Burton Power Stretch Glove Liner

Touchscreen compatible: Yes

Weight: 65 g (2.3 oz)

Price (MSRP): $25

Face/shell fabric: 84% Polyester, 16% elastane

Lining & insulation: No

Notable features:

  • Low-bulk Polartec Power Stretch fabric
  • Ergonomic pre-shaped fit
  • Screen Grab finger and thumb facilitate usage with touch screen devices

Pros:

  • Engineered to provide dexterity to the user (thanks to the four-way stretch build); great grippy layer on fingers and palm for handling trekking/ski poles, phones, ice tools, and doing everything else you’d need to do
  • The wind-resistant fabric doesn’t allow the wind to go through it, thereby preventing the loss of warmth
  • Versatile and comfortable enough to be used alone as well as liners (the Burton Power Stretch have a low-profile design and are easy to slide into warmer shells)
  • Nice design and good quality of the material and construction

Cons:

  • The touchscreen functionality doesn’t work that well
  • Run smaller than expected plus there are only 3 size options S/M, M/L, L/XL

Best for: Hiking/Versatility

Women’s Version: Unisex

Find the latest price:

Amazon | REI | Backcountry

 

#16 Icebreaker Merino 200 Oasis Glove Liners

Icebreaker Merino 200 Oasis Glove Liners

Touchscreen compatible: No

Weight: 26 g (0.9 oz)

Price (MSRP): $35

Face/shell fabric: 96% Merino wool, 4% Lycra/elastane

Lining & insulation: No

Notable features:

  • Lightweight 200 gm merino wool and Lycra (elastane or spandex) for a stretchy fit
  • Slim fit to allow extra under-glove warmth
  • Icebreaker wrap label on the right hand

Pros:

  • Excellent for layering: fit really well under most other winter gloves to add lightweight warmth without added bulk (plus they don’t get sweaty – the moisture-wicking and quick-drying properties of merino will keep your hands dry)
  • Soft and super comfortable to wear and what’s more, you can actually do things with your fingertips
  • Lightweight, compact, easy to pack, and will take up no space in your backcountry pack
  • Provide extra protection against sun rays preventing sunburns

Cons:

  • Flimsy – the construction and material will fall apart quickly especially if these liners are used by themselves
  • Don’t add much warmth: they aren’t the warmest gloves so we don’t recommend that you wear them solo on cold days
  • The fabric is a bit too stretchy

Best for: Cool-weather aerobic pursuits

Women’s Version: Unisex

Find the latest price:

AmazonBackcountry

 

#17 First Lite Aerowool Touch Liner Glove

First Lite Aerowool Touch Liner Glove

Touchscreen compatible: Yes

Weight: 26 g (0.9 oz)

Price (MSRP): $25

Face/shell fabric: Aerowool: 65% Merino wool, 35% integrated 37.5 Technology nylon

Lining & insulation: No

Notable features:

  • Lightweight, 200 gsm Aerowool fabric
  • Touch screen sensitive thumb and index finger
  • Ergonomic pre-shaped fit

Pros:

  • Light and add no bulk to your gear
  • High-quality Aerowool material intended for ultralight base layers; work well in hot or cold weather as it manages moisture wonderfully (the active particles of the 37.5 technology capture and release moisture vapor) and dries fast
  • The gloves work well in an incredibly large temperature spectrum – from hot desert to cold mountain (too thin to use as anything other than a liner under heavier cold weather gloves)
  • Perfect fit and provide all-day comfort in various situations and conditions

Cons:

  • The touchscreen part isn’t very effective on some screens (note that it does work fine on some screens)
  • Little durability: the material is very thin and the seams seem faulty
  • Tricky sizing

Best for: Ultralighters/Lightweight pursuits

Women’s Version: Unisex

Find the latest price:

Amazon

 

#18 Mountain Hardwear Power Stretch Stimulus Glove

Mountain Hardwear Power Stretch Stimulus Glove

Touchscreen compatible: Yes

Weight: 52 g (1.8 oz)

Price (MSRP): $40

Face/shell fabric: 84% Polyester, 16% elastane

Lining & insulation: No

Notable features:

  • Highly breathable Polartec Power Stretch
  • Overlay for added grip and durability
  • Touchscreen-compatible Stimulus technology on thumb and index finger

Pros:

  • Excellent moisture management as the fabric stays dry and comfortable by continuously wicking moisture for rapid evaporation
  • Form-fitting fleece fabric (the 4-way stretch material) makes this glove suitable for use as a main glove as well as a liner when paired with a warmer glove
  • Offer all-around functionality
  • Wind-resistant and can also shed snow and light rain staying breathable

Cons:

  • Run large so measure your hand carefully before ordering
  • The touchscreen capabilities don’t work as they should work

Best for: Everyday use

Women’s Version: Unisex

Find the latest price:

Amazon | REI | Backcountry

 

#19 REI Co-op Polartec Power Stretch Gloves

REI Co-op Polartec Power Stretch Gloves

Touchscreen compatible: Yes

Weight: 43 g (1.5 oz)

Price (MSRP): $35

Face/shell fabric: Polartec Power Stretch: 91% Polyester, 9% elastane

Lining & insulation: No

Notable features:

  • Rubberized palm pattern
  • Breathable Polartec Power Stretch fabric
  • Removable S-hook to keep the gloves together when not in use

Pros:

  • The agile 4-way stretch material (Power Stretch contouring fabric) has strong elastic fibers helping the glove to fit wonderfully and retain its shape
  • A lot of dexterity for handling tools and doing fine work
  • Made from lightweight and breathable material that can shed light rain
  • Soft and comfortable – perfect for everyday use

Cons:

  • Not sturdy: seams seem to be weak points, grips as well (start coming apart easily with any abrasion/general use)
  • For mid-temperatures – not warm enough without another layer

Best for: Moderate activity/Everyday use

Women’s Version: Unisex

Find the latest price:

REI

 

#20 Sitka Gear Traverse Glove

Sitka Gear Traverse Glove

Touchscreen compatible: Yes

Weight: 68 g (2.4 oz)

Price (MSRP): $40

Face/shell fabric: Polyester Spandex Knit

Lining & insulation: No

Notable features:

  • GORE OPTIFADE Concealment Subalpine/Open country camouflage pattern
  • Silver threads in the index finger and thumb allow the operation of a GPS and touch screen devices
  • Patterned for a tighter feel

Pros:

  • Work great in the field: with the GORE OPTIFADE Concealment Subalpine – a camo pattern that allows to effortlessly blend into your surroundings (fools animal vision)
  • Low-profile, surprisingly warm, and durable given how super thin they are (no extra bulk), they are also versatile, easy to maneuver in, and keep their dexterity for longer
  • Awesome for layering: can be worn alone or in combination with the Stormfront Glove or any other heavier glove/mitten
  • While best for cool climates, they actually work well in a wide array of temperatures and conditions

Cons:

  • Provide little warmth, especially in windy weather (so they’re a good option for fall or spring and not for cold weather unless used as underlayer)
  • The grip can be improved
  • Inner seams can cause unwanted friction

Best for: Hunting, hiking, and other activities in cool weather

Women’s Version: Available -> Amazon

Find the latest price:

Amazon

 

#21 Marmot Power Stretch Connect Gloves

Marmot Power Stretch Connect Gloves

Touchscreen compatible: Yes

Weight: 40 g (1.4 oz)

Price (MSRP): $35

Face/shell fabric: Polartec Power Stretch: 91% Polyester, 9% elastane

Lining & insulation: No

Notable features:

  • 3D wicking pulls away moisture to keep you dry
  • Durable carabiner loop for easy attachment to your belt or pack keeps gloves readily accessible
  • Free-flow stretch fit

Pros:

  • It’s an all-purpose liner that can also be used as a standalone in mild weather
  • The stretchy material fits easily and allows to manipulate small items without restricting finger mobility
  • Utilizes three-dimensional moisture-wicking technology for dry hands
  • It’s easy to use electronics and touchscreen devices (phones) without removing the gloves

Cons:

  • Thin and not very warm – not suitable for winter but for chilly fall and spring days instead
  • Inside seams can be rubbing against the fingers
  • These liners don’t seem to be very finely crafted

Best for: Hiking or running in the fall and spring

Women’s Version: Available -> Amazon

Find the latest price:

Amazon | Moosejaw

 

 

Table 1: Best liner gloves – comparison table

PRODUCTDESCRIPTIONPROSCONS
SmartWool Liner Gloves
SmartWool Liner Gloves

#1 Best liner gloves



Weight -> 43 g (1.5 oz)
Price -> $24
Touchscreen compatible -> Yes
Women's version -> Unisex


-> Versatile and functional
-> Lightweight
-> Allow for excellent manual dexterity
-> Very comfy: soft, cushy material


-> Weird sizing
-> Won't keep your hands warm by themselves in windy, snowy or cold conditions

Arcteryx Rho Gloves
Arc'teryx Rho Gloves

#2 Best lightweight liners



Weight -> 25 g (0.9 oz)
Price -> $39
Touchscreen compatible -> Yes
Women's version -> Unisex


-> Lightweight and compact gloves for milder winter days
-> Look and feel very comfortable - can be used as a glove or liner
-> Moisture-wicking fabric manages humidity very well
-> Touchscreen friendly design


-> Provide little warmth
-> Not very durable when used as gloves
-> Not for windy weather unless used as liner glove

Santic Dorin Cycling Liner Gloves
Santic Dorin Cycling Liner Gloves

#3 Best budget buy liner gloves



Weight -> 56 g (2 oz)
Price -> $21
Touchscreen compatible -> Yes
Women's version -> Unisex


-> Multi-purpose gloves
-> Grippy
-> Snug fit, work well when finger finesse is needed
-> Wind-resistant


-> Not very warm especially if you have poor circulation
-> Run small and a too-small range of size options
-> Inside seams can be rubbing against the fingertips

Outdoor Research Waterproof Liner Gloves
OR Waterproof Liner Gloves

#4 Best waterproof liner gloves



Weight -> 78 g (2.8 oz)
Price -> $55
Touchscreen compatible -> Yes
Women's version -> Unisex


-> Waterproof due to the Ventia inserts
-> Thick enough and warmer than most glove liner models
-> Versatile and comfortable
-> Grip and work well when some fine motor skills are required


-> Aren't that breathable and could retain some moisture
-> The outside fabric tend to wear out after some moderate/heavy use
-> The fleece material pills and is slow to dry

Dakine Element Liner Glove
Dakine Element Liner Gloves

#5 Best ski & snowboard liner gloves



Weight -> 300 g (10.6 oz)
Price -> $40
Touchscreen compatible -> Yes
Women's version -> No


-> Good as standalone gloves and as a glove liner
-> The Polartec Wind Pro reduces the amount of wind chill
-> Thin yet warm for liner gloves
-> Allow for excellent fine motor dexterity


-> The touchscreen feature doesn't work very well
-> Heavier than most other models of glove liners

Minus33 Merino Wool Fingerless Gloves
Minus33 Merino Wool Fingerless Gloves

#6 Best fingerless liner gloves



Weight -> 68 g (2.4 oz)
Price -> $19
Touchscreen compatible -> Yes
Women's version -> Unisex


-> Half-finger design to maintain dexterity
-> Have the characteristics and properties typical of merino wool
-> Work well as a standalone and as a liner
-> Good stretch and good fit


-> Edges are easy to get snagged
-> Can't withstand extreme wear and tear

Columbia Omni-Heat Touch Liner Gloves
Columbia Omni-Heat Touch Liner Gloves

#7


Weight -> 45 g (1.6 oz)
Price -> $30
Touchscreen compatible -> Yes
Women's version -> Unisex


-> With Omni-Heat thermal-reflective lining
-> Excellent moisture management
-> Versatile
-> Good bang for your buck - you'll hardly get any liners better at this price


-> Not wind-resistant
-> Not very grippy
-> Run a bit larger than expected

Minus33 Merino Wool Glove Liner
Minus33 Merino Wool Gloves Liner

#8



Weight -> 45 g (1.6 oz)
Price -> $19
Touchscreen compatible -> No
Women's version -> Unisex


->Versatile and easy to use while in the outdoors
-> Compact and comfortable fit
-> Reliable for winter performance
-> Fit under other gloves or mittens easily for added warmth


-> Slippery, can't provide good grip in icy conditions
-> No touch function
-> Not not very durable

Outdoor Research Vigor Midweight Sensor Gloves
OR Vigor Midweight Sensor

#9



Weight -> 51 (1.8 oz)
Price -> $30
Touchscreen compatible -> Yes
Women's version -> Yes


-> For high output activities in a wide range of conditions
-> A set of useful features
-> Not bulky at all
-> Comfy


-> The sensor tips and the silicone elements on the palm and mid fingertip aren't very durable
-> Not windproof

Carhartt Force Heavyweight Liner Knit Glove
Carhartt Force Heavyweight Liner Knit Glove

#10



Weight -> 45 g (1.6 oz)
Price -> $17
Touchscreen compatible -> Yes
Women's version -> Unisex


-> Can be worn alone in mild temps or as a liner
-> Moisture-wicking and quick-drying properties
-> Surprisingly high dexterity
-> Work reasonably well with touchscreens


-> Not among the most durable liners
-> The touchscreen sensitive pads work with most not all smartphones
-> Not heavyweight but actually rather thin

REI Co-op Merino Wool Liner Gloves
REI Co-op Merino Wool Liner

#11



Weight -> 37 g (1.3 oz)
Price -> $27
Touchscreen compatible -> Yes
Women's version -> Unisex


-> A nice blend of merino wool and polyester
-> Lightweight, useful, and versatile
-> Good dexterity
-> Minimal seams for reduced rubbing


-> Tend to wear out quickly when used as standalone
-> Not very good with touchscreens
-> Tend to pill

Under Armour Liner 2.0 Gloves
Under Armour Liner 2.0 Gloves

#12



Weight -> 91 g (3.2 oz)
Price -> $25
Touchscreen compatible -> Yes
Women's version -> No


-> Do a good job of keeping the hands warm
-> Excellent grip
-> The touch response is good
-> Nice and comfortable fit


-> Not meant for heavy work
-> Not overly warm
-> Run small

Dakine Storm Liner Gloves
Dakine Storm Liner Gloves

#13



Weight -> 280 g (9.9 oz)
Price -> $22
Touchscreen compatible -> Yes
Women's version -> Yes


-> Provide decent protection from the elements
-> The touch screen function is really responsive
-> Good for use with or without outer gloves
-> Can be machine washed without shrinking


-> A little thick for liners
-> For non-windy cold days unless paired with other gloves/mitts

Icebreaker Merino 260 Tech Glove Liners
Icebreaker Merino 260 Tech Glove Liners

#14



Weight -> 37 g (1.3 oz)
Price -> $40
Touchscreen compatible -> Yes
Women's version -> Unisex


-> Lightweight
-> Merino wool has many advantages over its alternatives
-> Easy to put on extra layer without adding bulk
-> An excellent option for cold-weather layering


-> Tend to fit loose and come off easily
-> Prone to durability issues
-> The touchscreen feature doesn't work that well

Burton Power Stretch Glove Liner
Burton Power Stretch Glove Liner

#15



Weight -> 65 g (2.3 oz)
Price -> $25
Touchscreen compatible -> Yes
Women's version -> Unisex


-> Engineered to provide dexterity
-> The fabric doesn't allow the wind to go through it
-> Versatile and comfortable
-> Good quality of the material and construction


-> The touchscreen functionality doesn't work that well
-> Run smaller than expected

Icebreaker Merino 200 Oasis Glove Liners
Icebreaker Merino 200 Oasis Glove Liners

#16



Weight -> 26 g (0.9 oz)
Price -> $35
Touchscreen compatible -> No
Women's version -> Unisex


-> Excellent for layering
-> Soft and super comfortable to wear
-> Lightweight, compact, easy to pack
-> Prevents sunburns


-> Flimsy construction
-> Don't add much warmth
-> The fabric is a bit too stretchy

First Lite Aerowool Touch Liner Gloves
First Lite Aerowool Touch Liner Glove

#17



Weight -> 26 g (0.9 oz)
Price -> $25
Touchscreen compatible -> Yes
Women's version -> Unisex


-> Light and add no bulk
-> High-quality Aerowool manages moisture
-> Work well in a large temperature spectrum
-> Provide all-day comfort


-> The touchscreen part isn't very effective on some screens
-> Little durability
-> Tricky sizing

Mountain Hardwear Power Stretch Stimulus Gloves
Mountain Hardwear Power Stretch Stimulus

#18



Weight -> 52 g (1.8 oz)
Price -> $40
Touchscreen compatible -> Yes
Women's version -> Unisex


-> Excellent moisture management
-> Form-fitting fleece fabric
-> Offer all-around functionality
-> Wind-resistant; shed snow and light rain


-> Run large
-> The touchscreen capabilities don't work as they should work

REI Co-op Polartec Power Stretch Gloves
REI Co-op Polartec Power Stretch Gloves

#19



Weight -> 43 g (1.5 oz)
Price -> $35
Touchscreen compatible -> Yes
Women's version -> Unisex


-> Agile 4-way stretch material
-> A lot of dexterity
-> Lightweight and breathable material
-> Perfect for everyday use


-> Not sturdy
-> Not warm enough without another layer

Sitka Gear Traverse Glove
Sitka Gear Traverse Glove

#20



Weight -> 68 g (2.4 oz)
Price -> $40
Touchscreen compatible -> Yes
Women's version -> Yes


-> Work great in the field
-> No extra bulk
-> Awesome for layering
-> Work well in a wide array of temps


-> Provide little warmth
-> The grip can be improved
-> Inner seams can cause unwanted friction

Marmot Power Stretch Connect Gloves
Marmot Power Stretch Connect Gloves

#21



Weight -> 40 g (1.4 oz)
Price -> $35
Touchscreen compatible -> Yes
Women's version -> Yes


-> All-purpose liner
-> Can manipulate small items without restricting finger mobility
-> Three-dimensional moisture-wicking technology
-> Easy to use a touchscreen device


-> Thin and not very warm
-> Inside seams can be rubbing against the fingers
-> Don't seem to be very finely crafted

 

Liner gloves buying advice or what to consider

Materials

Unlike the many different materials used for more solid and winter gloves, the most popular choices for glove liners are fewer. They are basically merino wool and some synthetic materials such as polyester, nylon, and elastane (there’s lots of information about the various materials in our guide on the best hiking gloves – there’s a link to the piece at the beginning of this post).

Of course, there are also some fancy-sounding materials that actually present various combinations of the above-mentioned materials. Take the Polartec Power Stretch contouring fabric, for instance. Used in at least three of the contenders on our list including the Burton Power Stretch Glove Liner and Marmot Power Stretch Connect, it is touted as an agile fabric that has ‘enough tensile strength for durable shape recovery’ and ‘performance wicking abilities’. In spite of the fancy name, this 4-way stretch material is actually a nice blend of polyester and elastane. The Aerowool used for the First Lite Aerowool Touch is a blend of 65% Merino wool and 35% integrated 37.5 Technology nylon for a best-of-both-worlds combination of odor-resistance and excellent moisture management to achieve optimized performance.

The SmartWool Liner Glove is a classic merino liner that’s on top of this chart because of its classic design, bulk-free fit, and incredible versatility. Another great design is the Minus33 Merino Wool Glove Liner, a good quality knit glove liner perfect for layering underneath shell gloves. Generally, merino is an excellent fabric for making base layers, gloves, and other garments that stay next to the skin. However, to expect some level of durability from a clothing item with merino, it should never be 100% as merino wool is not known for its resilience. The ratio of the merino wool blends to the all-synthetic blends is roughly 1:2 meaning that the all-synthetic blends dominate our list. And they dominate it for a reason – man-made materials and blends are engineered to meet specific requirements of the user. Models like the Arc’teryx Rho and Outdoor Research Waterproof Liners are a great example of liners capable of keeping the wearer dry and comfortable in dry and rainy conditions respectively.

Construction and durability

Durability depends mainly on the construction, the presence or absence of potential reinforcements, the stitching as well as the materials used. The expected lifetime of more durable glove liners should be longer plus such gloves should be able to survive some rough wear and tear to withstand harsh environments and conditions. Unfortunately, finding a pair of durable glove liners is fairly rare. The reason is simple – when talking about gloves, low weight (and dexterity) and durability are usually mutually exclusive. And most good designs are lightweight as they weigh between 25 g (0.9 oz) and 70 g (2.5 oz). Having said that, we consider the durability of some of the models presented here to be satisfactory.

Regarding durability, the Sitka Gear Traverse Gloves are on top of our list. Capable of withstanding some serious use and abuse, the Sitka Gear Traverse are very solid gloves for their mere 68 g (2.4 oz). Another design that surprised us a lot is the Santic Dorin Liner. They are much more durable than you would expect when you see them first and that’s not the only positive surprise coming from these liners. We think that the reasons for this are the smart design and the overall quality of the construction and craftsmanship. They’re not only budget-friendly, but their grip, dexterity, and wind resistance are also top quality. We recently published a comprehensive review discussing our experience with the 56 g (2 oz) Santic Dorin and we recommend it to anyone who has an interest in knowing more about these multi-purpose glove liners. Another design among the most durable ones is the Burton Power Stretch Glove Liner.

At the bottom of our list, you will find lighter models such as the Icebreaker Merino 200 Oasis Glove LinersMinus33 Merino Wool Glove Liner, and REI Co-op Merino Wool Liner Gloves. While having some great characteristics, properties, and features, their durability is not especially impressive. The same can be said for the Minus33 Merino Wool Fingerless Gloves whose main weakness is the fingerless construction itself.

Weather protection and thermal insulation

Liners are not famous for being able to protect the hands of the user from the elements. They are rarely waterproof (the Outdoor Research Waterproof Liner offering complete protection from wind and water is more of an exception) or even water-resistant. Honestly, waterproofness is not among the most important things liners should possess unlike dexterity and moisture management as well as effectiveness when worn underneath shell gloves.

Weather protection may not be among the most typical characteristics of glove liners but still, there are wind-resistant models that can be used safely in most conditions. The extra wind protection is especially important for the mountain where sudden weather changes are a common occurrence. Designs that we think are well-suited for high winds include the Santic Dorin Cycling Liner (because of the quality wind-stopper fabric) and Dakine Element Liner Gloves (due to the Polartec Wind Pro material that can reduce the amount of wind-chill considerably) as both utilize wind-resistant fabric that can cut the wind effectively.

Using liners with good insulative abilities is expected to increase the thermal effectiveness of your layering system, which is key for staying warm and comfortable during winter and cold-weather pursuits. Among the liners with the best insulative abilities, we have our top-rated SmartWool Liner Gloves and Dakine Storm Liner Gloves – two different models crafted from different materials but relying on the insulative properties of merino (and acrylic) and polyester fleece respectively. Fleece insulates well but merino – the best insulative material for liners – beats fleece hands down. Note that wearing gear with good insulative abilities is a great choice for walks and non-intensive pursuits in general. However, wearing too warm gloves during intense sports session is highly unlikely to keep your hands warm. It’s actually the opposite as your body will produce lots of heat and sweat leading to wetting from the inside and chilling. Ultimately, you should choose your gear carefully considering your specific activities and the need to conserve or release body heat.

Wicking and drying speed

As we emphasized above, the ability of a glove liner to manage moisture fast and efficiently is preferable to offering protection from snow and water. Why? Because for your hands to feel dry and comfortable, the ability to wick moisture away from the skin and transport it to the outer side of the liner is much more important than the ability to repel water coming from the outside. The latter can be done by wearing a waterproof shell glove on top of your liner whereas the former is the primary purpose of base layers and the main reason why they exist.

Of course, moisture management and quick-drying go hand in hand in coping with the heat and sweat that the body releases. Some man-made materials like polyester and Polartec Power Stretch have excellent moisture-wicking and quick-drying abilities to keep up with any activity. The downside of wearing such synthetics is that when wet they usually feel cold and clammy. Merino wool is another fiber offering superior water vapor permeability. It feels much warmer when wet in comparison to polyester. Additionally, merino is a naturally antimicrobial and non-malodorous option that dries relatively fast. However, because of the specific fiber construction of merino wool allowing for the absorption of up to 30% of its dry weight in moisture vapor, merino cannot dry as fast as polyester.

Weight and packability

The number of features and layers, the simplicity/complexity of the construction, the materials, and the intended use are widely regarded as the determining factors of weight and packability. Lightweight and compact models of liner gloves are usually more versatile for use on and off the trail during shorter and longer trips in various conditions as a standalone or as a layer underneath a pair of more solid gloves or mitts. Packable liners are also much easier to pack and store in a backpack especially if the available space is limited. But there are heavier designs with added insulation that are worth checking as they also have their advantages.

We’ve reviewed liners weighing from 25 g (0.9 oz) for the best lightweight design – the Arc’teryx Rho to 300 g (10.6 oz) for the heaviest model – Dakine Element Liner. Unsurprisingly, nineteen out of twenty-one models weigh less than 100 g (3.5 oz), while the heaviest two (both by Dakine) – the Storm Liner Gloves and Element Liner Gloves – come at 280 g (9.9 oz) and 300 g (10.6 oz) respectively.

Graph 1 and Graph 2 below show the weight of each of the 21 models in our review. The average weight is 72 g (or 2.5 oz) but this number drops by almost a third to 50 g (1.8 oz) when excluding the two outliers (the heaviest models). Then the Outdoor Research Vigor Midweight Sensor (51 g or oz) and Mountain Hardwear Power Stretch Stimulus (52 g or oz) become the closest to that number.

We like the look, feel, and comfort of the Arc’teryx Rho added to the excellent moisture-wicking and quick-drying properties they have. In addition, these extremely packable gloves with an ultralight design can be stored in a pocket easily (just like the SmartWool Liner). Another compact model we recommend especially for ultralighters is the First Lite Aerowool Touch Liner not only because the Aerowool technology is intended for making reliable ultralight base layers but also because it pulls away moisture from the skin and dries lightning-fast to ensure a great outdoor experience in a large temperature spectrum. And by the way, this material fights stink. Carhartt Force Heavyweight Liner Knit Glove is an old favorite of ours because of its stylish look, bulk-free fit, and useful features. Additionally, it allows for the manual dexterity needed to carry out a range of tasks. But we don’t know why the guys from Carhartt decided to call it this way. At 45 g (1.6 oz), this liner is not heavyweight by any means.

Graph 1: Weight comparison between liner gloves designs (in grams)

Liner gloves weight comparison grams

Graph 2: Weight comparison between liner gloves designs (in ounces) 

Liner gloves weight comparison ounces

Functionality and layering

When talking about glove liners, fit is really king, particularly bulk-free fit. It can’t be different because the bulk-free fit is a very important factor to the overall functionality and especially to:

  • Layering: glove liners should be easy to layer under other gloves or mitts when more warmth is needed; in this respect, snug fit is key. Regarding layering, we recommend you to check out the Minus33 Merino Wool Glove Liner.
  • Comfort: Arc’teryx Rho is among the most comfortable liners.
  • Dexterity: the dexterity of the fingers allows for doing a lot of things with your hands such as operating cameras, phones, and other devices and tools. Moreover, it’s much more difficult to zip and unzip a jacket, pants a backpack with bulky gloves on your hands. So, if dexterity is most important to your choice, we recommend the Carhartt Force Heavyweight.
  • Grip: grippy gloves like the Burton Power Stretch Glove Liner help keep a firm grip of tools and other equipment.
  • Use of electronics: all other things being equal, simpler, leaner models with little or no insulation are easier to use with touch screen devices and other types of electronics (for more information about the best models to use with a touch screen, see the ‘Touchscreen compatibility‘ section below).

Good fit is crucial to the perceived comfort and performance. Ill-fitting gloves can be a real danger to the user especially when climbing or skiing. A too loose glove is much easier to fall and disappear, plus it negatively impacts the fit, comfort, and fine motor skills. A too-tight liner could potentially restrict blood circulation. It’s also uncomfortable, reduces dexterity, and causes hands to be cold. So, make sure that your gloves do fit properly to avoid any complications.

Touchscreen compatibility

The widespread use of smartphones and other touch screen devices means that many outdoor lovers expect to be able to check their phone on the go without having to take off their gloves. So touchscreen compatibility is one of the most important features of liner gloves today. Fortunately, many models are touchscreen-friendly and come with touch-sensitive pads (all but two of the twenty-one designs discussed here are touch screen friendly). Unfortunately, quite a few of them work really well with touchscreens.

Glove liners grippy palm
Grippy palms and touchscreen friendly fingertips are two of the most typical features of glove liners

We’d recommend a couple of designs that will let you navigate a modern phone starting with the Columbia Omni-Heat Touch Liner Glove – a versatile liner crafted from moisture-wicking and breathable material with a heat-reflective lining. The form-fitting Omni-Heat Touch will allow you to operate your phone with ease. The Marmot Power Stretch Connect and UA Armour Liner 2.0 Gloves are also among those whose touch works very well.

Price

The price range of liner gloves is much smaller than the price range of winter gloves but this shouldn’t come as a surprise because of the specifics of these two types of gloves. Graph 3 below shows the price range of the best liners on our list. The price tags of the gloves in our review vary from $17 to $55 with an average price of approximately $31 (Columbia Omni-Heat Touch and Outdoor Research Vigor Midweight at $30 apiece cost a bit less than the average). More than half of all models can be bought for less than $30 including the best overall – SmartWool Liner Gloves ($24).

It was hard to choose the best budget design as both Santic Dorin and Carhartt Force Heavyweight are very close in our book and each of them has its pros and cons. Overall, we like the Santic Gloves a bit more but if you need a liner that works well in combination with other gloves, we’d recommend the Force Heavyweight as it can be easily paired with the Carhartt Safety Cuff A518 Glove or other gloves and mitts.

It’s worth noting that the only waterproof liner – the OR Waterproof – is the most expensive choice on our list. The Ventia insert is not the most expensive waterproof breathable insert but it certainly adds to the overall price tag of these liner gloves by Outdoor Research. The OR Waterproof are thick and warm and offer a good level of protection in bad weather.

Generally, from less than $20 to a bit more than $50, you can find good and reliable liner gloves with some nice features. The all-around winner SmartWool Liner Glove is a good example of this as it brings lightweight but warm insulation, versatility, and dexterity at an affordable price. If you need a pair of good liner gloves, it’s definitely worth paying the twenty-some dollar price tag.

Graph 3: Liner gloves price comparison (US dollars)

Liner gloves price - comparison

Conclusion

Liner gloves should be an important part of your cold-weather wardrobe. Versatile designs that can be used both as a standalone and as a part of a winter system are essential for diverse activities and environments in all kinds of weather.

In our minds, the SmartWool Liner Gloves are the best all-around liner gloves as they are lightweight, compact, versatile, and can be used alone or as an underlayer. The simple, bulk-free design is another plus for easy layering when temperatures drop. Another great liner is the Arc’teryx Rho, whose job is to provide a comfortable, next-to-skin fit without itching or chafing. Its bulk-free fit is great for use on the trail as a liner on cold winter days or as a standalone on cool spring and autumn days. Our top recommendation for budget-friendly liners is the Santic Dorin Cycling Liner – a wind-resistant multi-purpose glove that works equally well on the trail and as an everyday glove in town. The Minus33 Merino Wool Fingerless are among the best fingerless options for milder weather and when more dexterity is needed whereas the OR Waterproof Liner can do a good job of keeping your hands dry in inclement weather.

In this post, we discussed some of the best designs available on the market for liner gloves. We also tried to include everything else that could be of use to help you choose the right pair for your needs.

Which are your favorite liners? And why? We’d love to hear from you so don’t hesitate to make your recommendations and suggestions in the comments section below.

 

Related Articles

Best Hiking Gloves

Gloves and Mittens for the Cold

Warm Gloves vs Mittens

Ultimate Guide to Hiking Clothing

Properties of Cold Weather Hiking Clothing

Important Characteristics of Hiking Clothing

Best Cold Weather Socks

 

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